Research

Meet Dr. Elliot Stieglitz

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
December 23, 2016

St. Baldrick’s Fellow Dr. Elliot Stieglitz is a big reader, but not in the way that you might think. Over three years, he read the DNA of one hundred children with JMML, a rare leukemia, and he discovered something major. Read on to learn how his discovery could lead to better treatments for kids with this rare disease.

Dr.

For St. Baldrick’s Fellow Dr. Elliot Stieglitz, being a pediatric oncologist is the perfect blend of emotional satisfaction and intellectual stimulation.

His heart is with the kids and their families, guiding them through the toughest time in their lives. His head is in the lab, trying to find better treatments for childhood cancer.

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Research

Kids Are Not Little Adults: Researcher Studies Differences in AML Across Age Groups

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
May 26, 2016

Kids are special, and that’s why they need treatments made just for them. St. Baldrick’s Fellow Dr. Heather Schuback agrees. She’s looking at the very building blocks of acute myeloid leukemia cells to spot differences that could help kids get the targeted therapy they need.

Dr. Heather Schuback at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

St. Baldrick’s Fellow Dr. Heather Schuback works in the lab at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington.

Kids are not just little adults, says St. Baldrick’s Fellow Dr. Heather Schuback.

That means their cancers aren’t just smaller, younger versions of adult cancers. They are fundamentally different.

Dr. Schuback should know. Her St. Baldrick’s-funded research is looking at how changes in the DNA of tumor cells can predict who will do well during treatment and who won’t. This information could help doctors tailor therapies from the start, getting kids just the right amount of treatment to kill the cancer, while limiting late-effects.

But these differences aren’t limited to which kids will respond well to treatment and which won’t. It’s bigger than that.

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Research

St. Baldrick’s Researcher Discovers New Way to Detect Bone Cancer

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
February 24, 2016

St. Baldrick’s Fellow Dr. Wendy Rhoades has developed a new tool that could save lives — a blood test that can detect whether a patient has bone cancer. Read on for more about her incredible work and how it could help kids with cancer.

Dr. Wendy Rhoades works in the lab

Dr. Wendy Rhoades works in the lab at Texas Children’s Hospital.

What if a simple blood test could detect childhood cancer?

That’s exactly what Dr. Wendy Rhoades is looking into with her St. Baldrick’s-funded research.

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Facts

Pediatric Cancer Research Facts: A Decade of Successes [INFOGRAPHIC]

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
February 22, 2016

Kids are special, and childhood cancers are different than adult cancers. That’s why we’re funding research to find new therapies and cures just for kids.

We asked our researchers, “In the last 10 years, what’s been the greatest achievement in the field of pediatric cancer research?”

Here’s what they had to say.

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Facts

Babies and Cancer [Q&A]

by Erin Breese, M.D.
August 11, 2015

Anyone can get cancer — even babies. Dr. Erin Breese, a St. Baldrick’s Fellow studying infant leukemia, explains the signs, symptoms and treatment of babies with cancer, and how research is helping pinpoint better therapies so babies with cancer can grow up to live long, healthy lives.

a baby's feet

Can babies get cancer?

Unfortunately, cancer can occur at any age including during infancy. According to recent statistics, roughly 23 of every 100,000 babies are diagnosed with cancer each year.

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Research

A Small World Moment at the Think Tank

by Becky C. Weaver, Chief Mission Officer, St. Baldrick's Foundation
December 17, 2014

St. Baldrick’s Chief Philanthropy Officer, Becky Weaver, explains how a timely email led to a big realization. Join us and make a difference for kids with cancer. See ways to get involved.

St. Baldrick's logo

November marked my 10th year with the St. Baldrick’s Foundation. And how much has changed since that time!

Back then, we were excited to give over $3 million to support one large grant to the Children’s Oncology Group and our first St. Baldrick’s Fellow, Dr. Sharon Singh.

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News

Grapplers Putting Childhood Cancer Into Submission

by Natalie Stamer, St. Baldrick's Foundation
August 14, 2014

You don’t have to shave your head to raise money for childhood cancer research. You can Do What You Want instead!

Tap_Cancer_Out_BJJ_Open

Competitors from the 2014 Spring Tap Cancer Out BJJ Open in Stratford, CT. The tournament helped raise $54,000 for St. Baldrick’s.

With precise and careful technique, a small and relatively weak person can defend themselves against, and even overcome, a larger and stronger assailant.

That could easily be the description of a child fighting cancer with the best available treatment, but it’s also the concept behind Brazilian jiu-jitsu (BJJ) — a martial art that focuses on grappling and ground fighting until the opponent “submits” to defeat by “tapping out.”

And now the two have become one. The BJJ community is coming together to put childhood cancer into submission — they want to Tap Cancer Out.

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Families

‘Together We Are Better’: St. Baldrick’s and McKenna Claire Foundation Fund Pediatric Brain Tumor Research

by Kristine Wetzel
July 18, 2014

The McKenna Claire Foundation is supporting a St. Baldrick’s research grant to help kids with brain tumors. Kristine, whose daughter McKenna died of a brain tumor, explains why. See all the 2014 Summer Grants.

McKenna and her mom, Kristine Wetzel

Kristine with her daughter McKenna. McKenna was diagnosed with a brain tumor in January 2011 and died six months later.

In January 2011, our daughter McKenna was diagnosed with an extremely rare and aggressive form of brain cancer called diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, or DIPG.

Upon diagnosis, we were told that there was no hope for her survival and that the average life expectancy was 9-18 months. Because it is so rare, there had been little research done on this disease in the past 50 years, with virtually no change in treatment protocols or life expectancy.

For that reason, when we lost McKenna just six short months after diagnosis, we decided to do two things.

The first was to donate her tumor to Monje Lab at Stanford University, where a cell line was developed for use by researchers around the world. The second was to start a foundation in her name with the specific purpose of supporting progress in the field of pediatric brain cancer research.

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News

2014 Summer Grants: A Record-Breaking Year

by Becky C. Weaver, Chief Mission Officer, St. Baldrick's Foundation
July 16, 2014

It’s the biggest grants release of the year: the St. Baldrick’s Foundation Summer Grants. This year, the announcement is bigger than ever! Don’t miss the video where we surprise some of our researchers with the exciting news. To see the research St. Baldrick’s is funding near you, visit our Grants Search.

2014-Summer-Grants

You have made 2014 a record-breaking year.

In addition to helping St. Baldrick’s break a world record for head-shaving, this year our incredible St. Baldrick’s volunteers have raised more money for childhood cancer research than ever before — an amazing feat!

All of that hard work is paying off today, as we announce our annual Summer Grants. This is our biggest grant release of the year, and 2014 is a milestone for us all, as we give over $24.7 million in children’s cancer research grants —  more than any year prior.

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Research

These Pediatric Oncologists Weren’t Expecting This Great News [VIDEO]

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
July 16, 2014

We surprised a few recipients of our 2014 Summer Grants with some exciting news — and we caught it all on video.

This is one of the most anticipated times of the year at the St. Baldrick’s Foundation: the time when we are able to turn generously given donations over to the hands of the world’s best childhood cancer researchers.

This year, we added a little twist.

We told these researchers we had one final video interview for them before we would announce our funding decisions.

Watch the video and you’ll see — we tricked them. But it was worth it.

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