Facts

What Is Retinoblastoma?

by Murali Chintagumpala, M.D. and Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo, M.D.
May 11, 2020

Dr. Chintagumpala’s specific interests include the management of children with all brain tumors, retinoblastoma, bone tumors and kidney tumors. He serves as chair of the Retinoblastoma Sub-Committee for the Children’s Oncology Group and is a leader in conducting clinical trials involving children with brain tumors and Retinoblastoma.

Dr. Rodríguez-Galindo is a member of the St. Baldrick’s Scientific Advisory Committee. His research focuses on retinoblastoma, bone sarcomas, histiocytic disorders and rare childhood cancers.

what is retinoblastoma

What is Retinoblastoma?

Retinoblastoma is a cancer of the eye that only occurs in children and typically in very young children. Two-thirds of retinoblastoma patients are diagnosed before they’re 2 years old and more than 90% are diagnosed before turning 5.

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Facts

What Is Medulloblastoma?

by Elias Sayour, M.D., Ph.D. and Agnes Petrosiute, M.D.
May 1, 2020

Dr. Sayour and Dr. Petrosiute are both St. Baldrick’s Scholars. This blog was written by Dr. Petrosiute in May 2014 and updated in April 2020 by Dr. Sayour.

What is medulloblastoma?

Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. It originates in the back part of the brain called the cerebellum. In up to 1/3 of cases, it can spread to other parts of the brain and spinal cord. Most cases are diagnosed before age 10.

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Research

Announcing the Class of 2020: St. Baldrick’s Fellows and Summer Fellows

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
April 17, 2020

St. Baldrick’s donors play a key role in making new and better treatments possible for childhood cancer. One of the most important ways to make life-saving research possible — not only today but for decades to come — is to fund the training of the next generation of childhood cancer researchers.

That’s why we’re excited to announce today a bright and shiny new set of “next generation” grants.

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Research

Discoveries that Shift Paradigms with Dr. Poul Sorensen

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
March 23, 2020

St. Baldrick’s is all about shifting paradigms. When three men decided to shave heads at their industry’s March 17, 2000 St. Patrick’s Day party, they didn’t set out to change the landscape of childhood cancer research funding. But today the St. Baldrick’s Foundation is the largest non-government funder of childhood cancer research grants.

Twenty years later, the paradigm shifts keep coming, and Poul Sorensen, MD, PhD has been a part of several of them. Last month we joined some very special guests on a visit to his lab at the University of British Columbia, where he is a Professor of Pathology and holds the Johal Endowed Chair in Childhood Cancer Research.

two doctors Dr. Poul Sorensen (right) with his Co-Principal Investigator, Dr. Mads Daugaard (left).

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Facts

What Is Wilms Tumor?

by Elizabeth Perlman, MD and Jeffrey S. Dome, MD, PhD.
March 10, 2020
What-Is-Wilms-Tumor.png

What is Wilms tumor?

Wilms tumor is a cancer of the kidney. It is one of the most common types of childhood cancer, with approximately 500 new patients a year in the United States alone. It was named after German surgeon Max Wilms, who is credited with discovering the cancer in 1899. There are several other less common types of kidney cancer that affect children and teenagers. These include clear cell sarcoma, malignant rhabdoid tumor, and renal cell carcinoma.

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Research

Research Outcomes: Climbing Toward Cures for Childhood Cancers

by Becky C. Weaver, Chief Mission Officer, St. Baldrick's Foundation
March 3, 2020

Editor’s Note: Last August, we began a series of blog posts on the outcomes of research that you, our donors, help to fund. Becky Chapman Weaver, Chief Mission Officer, St. Baldrick’s Foundation, provides us with an update.

man in lab

If you think of a new cure as the top of an enormous mountain, imagine all the work that comes before anyone can stand on that summit for the first time. It takes discovering which routes lead to the top and which are dead ends or sheer cliffs. It takes knowing how to avoid mountain lions, grizzly bears and avalanches. And it takes putting one foot in front of another thousands of times – and often mounting new ascents year after year.

In the world of research, we can think of basic science or laboratory work as the discovery that tells our climber which way to go. Without that, no one gets anywhere. Translational research is our climber using that knowledge to get uphill or to bring those discoveries to the benefit of patients. And a clinical trial tells us whether we’ve achieved the summit – or whether a treatment is more effective for patients than the previous standard of care.

Your support of the St. Baldrick’s Foundation makes every step of the climb possible. Already we have funded more than 1,500 grants, covering every stage of research. Here are a few recent examples of outcomes you can be proud of.

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Advocacy

Speak Up for Kids’ Cancer: February 2020

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
February 27, 2020

Read on for updates on the State of the Union, the President’s budget proposal, and events during Rare Disease Week on Capitol Hill.

Ambassador Shamari holding sign

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Facts

What You Should Know About Research into Rare Pediatric Cancers

by Becky C. Weaver, Chief Mission Officer, St. Baldrick's Foundation
February 25, 2020

Rare Disease Day is observed on the last day of February, but the St. Baldrick’s Foundation fights rare diseases year-round.

What is rare disease?

When it comes to cancer, or even diseases as a whole, “rare” is a misleading word.

In the U.S., a rare disease is defined as “any disease or condition that affects fewer than 200,000 people in the United States, or about 1 in 1,500 people.” About 72% of rare diseases are genetic, and of those, 70% start in childhood.

Worldwide, people with rare diseases make up less than 6% of the population. But more than 6,000 rare diseases have been identified so far, and they affect more than 300 million around the world. If these people were a country, they would be the world’s third largest nation.

rare disease stats

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Research

Africa Brings Different Pediatric Cancer Challenges

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
February 15, 2020

On this International Childhood Cancer Day, let’s look at the continent of Africa and, specifically, a cancer researcher who is working to create a vaccine for a particularly frightening kind of cancer.

Doctor in lab

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Facts

What Is Neuroblastoma?

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
January 31, 2020
What is Neuroblastoma graphic

Susan L. Cohn, M.D., chair of the St. Baldrick’s Scientific Advisory Committee and world renowned neuroblastoma expert, explains what neuroblastoma is and how St. Baldrick’s research is contributing to better outcomes for patients.

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