Showing 21-40 of 126 results
Gordon Cohen M.D., M.P.H.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Baltimore, MD
Institution: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine affiliated with Johns Hopkins Children's Center

Pediatric Philadelphia Chromosome positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has a poor prognosis despite the introduction of Ph+ targeted drugs (TKIs). And for patients that fail to respond or relapse after TKIs, the prognosis remains grim. Dr. Cohen is studying why pediatric Ph+ ALL patients relapse (or fail to respond) to TKI treatment. Dr. Cohen has shown in early studies that combinations of TKIs and another new class of drugs can overcome TKI resistance. Because many of the drugs Dr. Cohen and his team are testing are commercially available, promising data from their research may move into future clinical trials.

Gina Ney M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2019
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Institution: University of Michigan affiliated with C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital

Based on progress to date, Dr. Ney was awarded a new grant in 2018 to fund an additional year of this Fellow award. Many cancers include groups of cells that are relatively inactive, meaning that they divide less frequently than other cells and use fewer nutrients from their environment. This inactivity often makes these cells less susceptible to chemotherapy because these cells do not take in chemotherapy drugs due to their slow growth. As a result, these cells can remain present after treatment, potentially leading to disease recurrence. Dr. Ney is studying these inactive cells and their behavior, to more fully understand cancer and how to better treat it. The initial grant was made with generous support from Tough Like Ike, which was created in honor of cancer fighter Issac "Ike" Yarmon. The organization raises awareness and funds for leukemia and childhood cancer research. This additional award is named for Ben's Green Drakkoman Fund created in memory of Ben Stowell who battled an aggressive form of osteosarcoma yet lived life with courage and an inspiring determination to survive. The fund is named after the superhero he created to help him better understand his body's fight against cancer.

Michael Deel M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2019
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Durham, NC
Institution: Duke University Medical Center affiliated with Duke Children's Hospital & Health Center

Based on progress to date, Dr. Deel was awarded a new grant in 2018 to fund an additional year of this Fellow award. Rhabdomyosarcoma is a childhood cancer of the muscle that has two major subtypes. Children with the alveolar type do very poorly, as these are frequently recurrent and metastatic. Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells have a specific fusion protein that is a powerful cancer driver and that does not yet have a pharmaceutical treatment. Dr. Deel and his team recently found that the Hippo pathway, normally functions to suppress tumor growth, is not correctly regulated in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, which leads to TAZ (a co-activator) activating pro-tumoric gene transcription. Dr. Deel is studying the interaction between the protein and the co-activator TAZ as a novel therapeutic target.

Melissa Mathias M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: New York, NY
Institution: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Children's cancer can spread through the body by hiding from the body’s immune system. There are certain cells, called regulatory T cells, that make it easier for cancer to hide by turning down the body’s immune system. Children with cancer who have a higher number of these cells seem to have a poorer outcome. Additionally, some cancers have these cells inside them. Dr. Mathias's lab has made a drug that can kill regulatory T cells, and will test this drug in a model to see the effects of killing the regulatory T cells, hopefully helping the body to improve the immune system's ability to kill cancer cells.

Arpan Sinha MBBS
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 08-31-2019
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Oklahoma City, OK
Institution: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center affiliated with The Children's Hospital at OU Medical Center

Based on progress to date, Dr. Sinha was awarded a new grant in 2018 to fund an additional year of this Fellow award. Myelodysplastic syndrome is a rare disease that affects the stem cells in the bone marrow, which causes decreased blood counts. It is also known to be a precursor to acute myeloid leukemia. Cellular mutations are present in majority of these cases, however the mechanisms of development of these mutations are still not clear. Dr. Sinha is studying these interactions, in order to identify new prognostic factors and therapeutic options for these patients. Awarded at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and transferred to University of Oklahoma Health and Science Center.

Samuel John M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2019
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Dallas, TX
Institution: University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas

Based on progress to date, Dr. John was awarded a new grant in 2018 to fund an additional year of this Fellow award. Unfortunately, even with intensive treatment, only 60% of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) will survive the disease. Intensifying standard therapies have failed to improve survival rates, so a new approach is needed. Dr. John is creating a novel receptor that will specifically target a marker on AML cells. He will put this new receptor on T-cells of the body, which will then target and kill the leukemia cells. Dr. John hopes to improve outcomes for pediatric AML with this grant which is generously supported by Super Soph's Pediatric Cancer Research Fund. Sophie Rossi was diagnosed with AML at 3 months of age. Throughout her courageous battle, she was always smiling, always joyful. This fund was created to honor her spunky, sweet spirit by funding research to find cures for AML and all childhood cancers.

Daniel Zinn M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Houston, TX
Institution: Baylor College of Medicine affiliated with Texas Children's Hospital, Vannie E. Cook Jr. Children's Cancer and Hematology Clinic

Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare cancer of the immune cells that can cause a wide range of symptoms, ranging from a rash to lethal multi-organ disease. Dr. Zinn hypothesizes that a patient's symptoms are determined by a combination of the patient's specific mutation and the specific immune cell that becomes mutated. Dr. Zinn is investigating the causes of LCH in order to develop the most effective and safe therapies for each patient.

Agne Taraseviciute M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Seattle, WA
Institution: Seattle Children's Hospital affiliated with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington

Children with aggressive leukemia frequently require a bone marrow transplant to achieve a cure. Some children have a small number of leukemia cells remaining before receiving a bone marrow transplant, which makes it very likely that their leukemia will recur. Dr. Taraseviciute, the Team Abby St. Baldrick's Fellow, is studying the power of the immune system to fight any remaining leukemia cells after bone marrow transplantation. To do this, Dr. Taraseviciute and her team are making T cells (a special type of immune cell) that can recognize and eliminate leukemia cells to provide a chance for a cure for children who have already received a bone marrow transplant. Abby is a brave and spunky 9-year old who loves the colors blue and green. She was diagnosed with Pre-B ALL in 2011 and had a successful bone marrow transplant but is currently battling graft vs. host disease. The Team Abby Gives Hero Fund unites the incredible support of family and friends in Abby's honor and inspires others to join the fight for cures and better treatments.

Avanthi Shah M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: San Francisco, CA
Institution: University of California, San Francisco affiliated with UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital

Based on progress to date, Dr. Shah was awarded a new grant in 2017 to fund an additional year of this Fellow award. One challenge in caring for solid tumor patients is monitoring treatment response, as doctors currently use radiology studies that are unable to detect residual disease. Circulating tumor DNA is released by cancer cells into the patient’s bloodstream and carries tumor-specific mutations. Circulating tumor DNA could be used as a marker to measure tumor burden by a simple blood draw. Researchers recently developed a tool to measure circulating tumor DNA in lung cancer patients. Dr. Shah aims to design a similar tool for three common pediatric tumors. This additional grant is made with generous support from the Dorian J. Murray Foundation which was created in honor and in memory of Dorian 'Dstrong' Murray who passed away from Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma. The Foundation is committed to provide financial support to families of children fighting cancer, raise awareness and educate people and fund new and breakthrough research. The first year of Dr. Shah's fellow award was named for the Sweet Caroline Hero Fund created to honor the memory of Caroline Richards who was diagnosed with osteosarcoma. This fund pays tribute to her giving spirit and her compassion for others by supporting osteosarcoma research to help kids with cancer.

Juan Vasquez M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: New Haven, CT
Institution: Yale University affiliated with Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital

Based on progress to date, Dr. Vasquez was awarded a new grant in 2017 to fund an additional year of this Fellow award. Dr. Vasquez, the Tap Cancer Out St. Baldrick’s Fellow, is investigating the human immune system’s response to pediatric brain tumors and how it can be manipulated in order to develop new treatments. Immune therapies can be highly specific for cancer cells because they target proteins only found on the cancer while sparing the normal cells. This research is using nanoparticles that contain the target protein as well as medications that block other cells that dampen the immune system in order to increase the immune system’s ability to kill the cancer cells. This grant recognizes the partnership with Tap Cancer Out, a jiu-jitsu based 501(c)(3) nonprofit raising awareness and funds for cancer fighting organizations on behalf of the grappling community.

Andrew Smitherman M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Institution: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill affiliated with UNC Children's Hospital

Most childhood cancer survivors develop complications associated with their treatment and many will require hospitalization. Dr. Smitherman is working to determine how often survivors are seen in an emergency department or hospitalized in the first years following completion of treatment. This research is also reviewing which medications are prescribed during this time to better understand what medical complications survivors are experiencing. With this knowledge, Dr. Smitherman hopes to prevent complications and improve survivors' quality of life.

Sarah Richman M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Philadelphia, PA
Institution: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia affiliated with University of Pennsylvania

The immune system not only fights infection, but can also fight cancer cells. Recently, doctors have been able to use patients' own immune cells to help treat their cancer. Sometimes, cancer cells can hide from the immune cells. Dr. Richman, the Ben's Green Drakkoman St. Baldrick’s Fellow, aims to learn how cancer cells hide from immune cells, and how to make these cancer-killing immune cells more specific to tumor cells to avoid harming the patient's normal tissues. This grant is named for the Ben's Green Drakkoman Fund, created to honor the memory of Ben Stowell who battled osteosarcoma with an inspiring determination to live life fully. The fund is named after a super hero Ben created named the Green Drakkoman who defeats his enemy, the Evil Alien.

Nickhill Bhakta M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Memphis, TN
Institution: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Based on progress to date, Dr. Bhakta was awarded a new grant in 2017 to fund an additional year of this Fellow award. While the increase cure rates for many childhood cancers is cause for celebration, researchers are increasingly recognizing the long-term consequences of cancer therapy. Recent studies have shown that survivors of childhood cancer are at risk for developing a wide range of long-term health problems and die at an earlier age due to the lifelong side effects of their curative therapies. Dr. Bhakta is investigating the magnitude of chronic health conditions experienced by survivors to inform future approaches for prevention and early detection to maximize long-term survival and quality of life. A portion of the grant was generously supported by the Morgan and Friends Fund created to honor Morgan Loudon and celebrate her strength and determination as a cancer survivor while rallying family and friends to “battle on” in the search for cures and better treatments.

Corinne Summers M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Seattle, WA
Institution: Seattle Children's Hospital affiliated with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington

Relapsed pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia is best treated by allogeneic stem cell transplant, including cord blood transplant. The significant number of children with persistent leukemia prior to transplant are at increased risk of post-transplant relapse and poor survival. Dr. Summers is working to prevent relapse by engineering cord blood donor T cells to target leukemia. The engineered T cells are infused following transplant to kill residual leukemia. This research aims to demonstrate that these cells are functional in eliminating leukemia. A portion of the grant was named for the Georgia and the Peachy Keens Hero Fund created in honor of Georgia Moore and celebrates the 5th year past her cancer diagnosis. As a leukemia survivor, she inspires others to “just keep swimming” in raising awareness, hope, and research dollars.

Adam Green M.D.
Funded: 09-01-2014 through 08-31-2017
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Denver, CO
Institution: University of Colorado affiliated with Children's Hospital Colorado

Based on progress to date, Dr. Green was awarded a new grant in 2016 to fund an additional year of this Fellow award. High-grade gliomas (HGG) are brain tumors that are usually fatal in children. Dr. Green's work has recently shown promising results using a new medicine called Selinexor in laboratory models of HGG. Dr. Green, the Luke’s Army Pediatric Cancer Research Fund St. Baldrick’s Fellow, believes Selinexor works by restoring the function of proteins that suppress the tumor and acts as the brakes in cancer cells. Dr. Green's team is testing Selinexor for safety in children with various brain and solid tumors, and to see if it can extend survival. A portion of this grant is named for the Luke's Army Pediatric Cancer Research Fund. Luke Ungerer brought smiles and sunshine wherever he went with plenty to share with everyone. He battled a brain tumor with a positive spirit and inspired others with his courage in his short life. This fund was created to carry on Luke’s legacy of positivity with the hope that it will ripple across many lives for many years to come. Awarded at Boston Children's Hospital and transferred to University of Colorado.

Elliot Stieglitz M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2014 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: San Francisco, CA
Institution: University of California, San Francisco affiliated with UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital

Based on progress to date, Dr. Stieglitz was awarded a new grant in 2016 to fund an additional year of this Fellow award. Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a type of blood cancer that affects young children and is very difficult to treat. Currently available treatments cure only half of these patients, with some children experiencing rapid death, while others get better with very little treatment. Unfortunately, no one knows why this happens. Dr. Stieglitz is using the latest breakthroughs in scientific technology to determine why some patients benefit from treatment while others do not.

Carl Koschmann M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2014 through 06-30-2016
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Institution: University of Michigan affiliated with C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital

Pediatric glioblastoma (GBM) is a devastating tumor and most patients with this diagnosis will not survive two years. Adolescent patients with GBM often have mutation of the ATRX gene. As treatments for cancer are becoming increasingly personalized, mutated ATRX genes allow for a promising target for treatment in patients with GBM. The goal of Dr. Koshmann's work is to determine if mutated ATRX genes create a susceptibility to certain DNA-damaging treatments.

Christopher Forlenza M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2014 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: New York, NY
Institution: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Based on progress to date, Dr. Forlenza was awarded a new grant in 2016 to fund an additional year of this Fellow award. Neuroblastoma patients can be treated with a molecule called 3F8, which attaches to tumor cells to tell the immune system that they should be killed. Dr. Forlenza, the David's Warriors St. Baldrick's Fellow, is researching how a part of the immune system, called natural killer (NK) cells, influences the success or failure of 3F8. Currently, researchers know that the ability of the NK cells to respond to 3F8 can be inhibited by interactions with the tumor cells. This research is testing a second molecule to block these interactions, aiming to improve NK function and increase tumor killing. This grant is named for the “David’'s Warriors” Hero Fund created in memory of David Heard to honor the spirit in which he lived, embracing life until the very end.

Robin Parihar M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2014 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Houston, TX
Institution: Baylor College of Medicine affiliated with Texas Children's Hospital, Vannie E. Cook Jr. Children's Cancer and Hematology Clinic

Based on progress to date, Dr. Parihar was awarded a new grant in 2016 to fund an additional year of this Fellow award. Some children with cancer have solid tumors, or collections of abnormally growing cells, within their organs. These collections are made up of mostly tumor cells, but also of other cells that help the tumor hide from the body’s immune system and grow. Dr. Parihar is working to creating a new method to destroy these other cells found within solid tumors so that they can’t help the tumor grow. This research aims to train the immune system to specifically recognize and kill these other cells, with the ultimate goal of curing the child of cancer.

Sun Choo M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2013 through 06-30-2016
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: San Diego, CA
Institution: University of California, San Diego affiliated with Rady Children's Hospital San Diego

Based on progress to date, Dr. Choo, the Tap Cancer Out St. Baldrick’s Fellow, was awarded a new grant in 2015 to fund an optional third year of this fellowship. Ewing sarcoma is a bone and soft tissue cancer that occurs in adolescent and young adults (AYAs). When the cancer spreads (metastasis), survival falls below 30% despite aggressive chemotherapy and surgery. Fortunately, promising data has identified certain genes that are specifically turned on in metastatic Ewing cells. By developing targeted therapy against these gene products, Dr. Choo hopes to effectively treat Ewing sarcoma. In addition, targeting this unique pathway may reduce the use of conventional toxic chemotherapy agents that can cause cancer themselves. Ultimately, this research may help reduce both morbidity and save countless children with metastatic Ewing sarcoma. This grant recognizes the partnership with Tap Cancer Out, a jiu-jitsu based 501(c)(3) nonprofit raising awareness and funds for cancer fighting organizations on behalf of the grappling community.