Showing 1-12 of 12 results
David Mulama Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2020
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: Duarte, CA
Institution: Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope

Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is a virus that causes cancer known as Kaposi sarcoma, which is very common in HIV+ children, especially in Africa and sometimes in individuals who get an organ transplant. Dr. Mulama is designing and testing a vaccine that prevents and treats the viral infection, as well as antibodies to detect infection in people. He will also test the vaccine so that one day it can be used as a treatment to prevent Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection and Kaposi sarcoma in more than 40,000 patients worldwide each year.

David Mulama Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2020
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: Kakamega, Eldoret
Institution: Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology

Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is a virus that causes cancer known as Kaposi sarcoma, which is very common in HIV+ children, especially in Africa and sometimes in individuals who get an organ transplant. Dr. Mulama is designing and testing a vaccine that prevents and treats the viral infection, as well as antibodies to detect infection in people. He will also test the vaccine so that one day it can be used as a treatment to prevent Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection and Kaposi sarcoma in more than 40,000 patients worldwide each year.

Haiwei Lian M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: Wuhan, China
Institution: Wuhan University School of Medicine

MYCN-driven neuroblastoma accounts for about 30% of neuroblastomas and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Casein Kinase 2 (CK2) is an enzyme that is currently in clinical trials to treat multiple cancers. However, its efficacy on MYCN-driven neuroblastoma remains unknown. Dr. Lian's research aims to test if CK2 inhibition can serve as a new strategy to treat MYCN-driven neuroblastoma. A portion of this grant was named for The Amanda Rozman Pediatric Cancer Research Fund created in memory of Amanda Rozman and honors her courageous battle with neuroblastoma by funding promising new treatments and clinical trials in the area of translational research.

Haiwei Lian M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: Boston University

MYCN-driven neuroblastoma accounts for about 30% of neuroblastomas and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Casein Kinase 2 (CK2) is an enzyme that is currently in clinical trials to treat multiple cancers. However, its efficacy on MYCN-driven neuroblastoma remains unknown. Dr. Lian's research aims to test if CK2 inhibition can serve as a new strategy to treat MYCN-driven neuroblastoma. A portion of this grant was named for The Amanda Rozman Pediatric Cancer Research Fund created in memory of Amanda Rozman and honors her courageous battle with neuroblastoma by funding promising new treatments and clinical trials in the area of translational research.

Peter Wasswa M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: Lilongwe, Malawi
Institution: Kamuzu Central Hospital

Whereas more than 80% of children with leukemia and lymphoma in the United States are cured with chemotherapy, in Africa a diagnosis with one of these diseases is an outright death sentence. To enable adaptation of chemotherapy protocols from the U.S. to treating children in Africa, Dr. Wasswa is studying the prevalent types of leukemia and lymphoma in children in Malawi and how their genetic code may affect response to chemotherapy.

Peter Wasswa M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: Houston, TX
Institution: Baylor College of Medicine affiliated with Texas Children's Hospital, Vannie E. Cook Jr. Children's Cancer and Hematology Clinic

Whereas more than 80% of children with leukemia and lymphoma in the United States are cured with chemotherapy, in Africa a diagnosis with one of these diseases is an outright death sentence. To enable adaptation of chemotherapy protocols from the U.S. to treating children in Africa, Dr. Wasswa is studying the prevalent types of leukemia and lymphoma in children in Malawi and how their genetic code may affect response to chemotherapy.

Hui Zhang Ph.D., M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2014 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: Guangzhou, China
Institution: The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University

Based on progress to date, Dr. Zhang was awarded a new grant in 2017 to fund an additional year of this International Scholar award. Though cure rates have improved dramatically, geographic inequities in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy remain evident between developed vs. low-middle income countries. In China, about 7,700 newly-diagnosed children with ALL every year receive therapy thanks to the coverage provided by a special national health insurance scheme established in 2010. With the drastic increase in access to clinical care, the challenge is now shifting from remedying the inability to pay for ALL therapy to delivering better therapy and improving outcome. Dr. Zhang is working to bring improved therapy to China. This represents an unprecedented opportunity for translational research of childhood ALL in China, with potential impacts for a large number of patients.

Hui Zhang Ph.D., M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2014 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: Memphis, TN
Institution: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Based on progress to date, Dr. Zhang was awarded a new grant in 2017 to fund an additional year of this International Scholar award. Though cure rates have improved dramatically, geographic inequities in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy remain evident between developed vs. low-middle income countries. In China, about 7,700 newly-diagnosed children with ALL every year receive therapy thanks to the coverage provided by a special national health insurance scheme established in 2010. With the drastic increase in access to clinical care, the challenge is now shifting from remedying the inability to pay for ALL therapy to delivering better therapy and improving outcome. Dr. Zhang is working to bring improved therapy to China. This represents an unprecedented opportunity for translational research of childhood ALL in China, with potential impacts for a large number of patients.

Soad Fuentes Alabi M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2013 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: San Salvador, El Salvador
Institution: Hospital Nacional de Niños Benjamin Bloom

Based on progress to date, Dr. Fuentes Alabi was awarded new grants in 2016 and 2017 to fund additional years of this International Scholar award. The majority of children with cancer live in countries with limited resources and yet we know very little about the types of pediatric cancer and their distribution in those settings. Studies suggest that the incidence of some types of childhood cancer is not the same among different ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Epidemiology studies focused on those unique areas of the world are very important because they can help improve our overall understanding of childhood cancers. This project aims to build epidemiology research capacity in Central America through the training of Dr. Fuentes Alabi.

Soad Fuentes Alabi M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2013 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: Memphis, TN
Institution: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Based on progress to date, Dr. Fuentes Alabi was awarded new grants in 2016 and 2017 to fund additional years of this International Scholar award. The majority of children with cancer live in countries with limited resources and yet we know very little about the types of pediatric cancer and their distribution in those settings. Studies suggest that the incidence of some types of childhood cancer is not the same among different ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Epidemiology studies focused on those unique areas of the world are very important because they can help improve our overall understanding of childhood cancers. This project aims to build epidemiology research capacity in Central America through the training of Dr. Fuentes Alabi. Awarded at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and transferred to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

Joseph Lubega M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2013 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: Houston, TX
Institution: Baylor College of Medicine affiliated with Texas Children's Hospital, Vannie E. Cook Jr. Children's Cancer and Hematology Clinic

Based on progress to date, Dr. Lubega was awarded new grants in 2016 and 2017 to fund additional years of this International Scholar award. A third of cancers in children in Africa are due to Burkitt's lymphoma. Burkitt's lymphoma seems to arise from the body's attempt to fight Epstein-Barr virus and malaria infections. This study measures infection-fighting proteins in children with and without Burkitt's lymphoma. The goal is to discover if these infection-fighting proteins in blood or saliva can be used as specific indicators of Burkitt's lymphoma. These proteins can be developed into clinical tests for early detection and monitoring treatment for children with cancer.

Joseph Lubega M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2013 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: International Scholar
Institution Location: Kampala, Uganda
Institution: Uganda Cancer Institute

Based on progress to date, Dr. Lubega was awarded new grants in 2016 and 2017 to fund additional years of this International Scholar award. A third of cancers in children in Africa are due to Burkitt's lymphoma. Burkitt's lymphoma seems to arise from the body's attempt to fight Epstein-Barr virus and malaria infections. This study measures infection-fighting proteins in children with and without Burkitt's lymphoma. The goal is to discover if these infection-fighting proteins in blood or saliva can be used as specific indicators of Burkitt’s lymphoma. These proteins can be developed into clinical tests for early detection and monitoring treatment for children with cancer.