Showing 21-37 of 37 results
Myles Cockburn Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 12-31-2013
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Los Angeles, CA
Institution: University of Southern California

Despite major improvement in outcomes for children and older adults with cancer over the past three decades, there has been little or no improvement in survival among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients (ages 15-39 years). The reasons for this disparity are not completely understood and likely include many factors, including differences in tumor biology, insurance coverage, clinical trial participation and adherence to treatment. This research aims to produce detailed information about the factors affecting AYA cancer incidence and survival that will help doctors target care and close this gap. The project will also produce detailed information for local cancer care service providers on where to target their efforts, and information that will help clinicians recruit AYA patients most in need of help to clinical trials to address their needs.

Kathy Ruble Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 12-31-2013
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Baltimore, MD
Institution: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine affiliated with Johns Hopkins Children's Center

Childhood cancer survivors are at risk for developing long term health problems including heart disease. Dr. Ruble's research finds ways to make survivors healthy by participating in physical activity. Currently less than 50 percent of survivors participate in adequate amounts of exercise, which increases the risk of developing health problems. This project aims to find out the best way to support survivors in changing behaviors and being healthy.

Peter Cole M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 06-30-2014
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Bronx, NY
Institution: Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University affiliated with Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Montefiore Medical Center

Although most children with leukemia can be cured, chemotherapy frequently causes permanent brain dysfunction in survivors. With previous support from St. Baldricks, Dr. Cole's lab identified promising protective interventions, and he will now test them among those children at greatest risk for brain damage. To identify this population researchers are studying whether variation in neurocognitive function among leukemia survivors is related to specific inherited differences in genes related to repair mechanisms or to metabolism of drugs thought to cause cognitive deficits.

Lisa Schwartz Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 12-31-2014
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Philadelphia, PA
Institution: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia affiliated with University of Pennsylvania

Even though more and more children are being cured of cancer, the treatment can cause major life-long health problems for survivors. Unfortunately, most adult survivors don't seek appropriate medical care to monitor and care for these problems. This project is to study whether or not adult survivors referred to adult-focused follow-up care actually engage in such care and what might get in the way of doing so. The results of the study will help medical providers better prepare young adult survivors to engage in adult-focused follow-up care to assure that they stay as healthy as possible.

Robert Noll Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 06-30-2014
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Institution: University of Pittsburgh affiliated with Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh

Having friends is vitally important for all children. Children surviving brain tumors often have physical problems (jerky movements, slurred speech, etc.) and cognitive delays caused by their disease or treatment. These cancer survivors are frequently described by peers as "not well liked," "having few friends" and "isolated". This puts them at risk for being bullied, dropping out of school, becoming anxious or depressed, and being less likely to marry or have good jobs as adults. Dr. Noll is conducting a research-backed, school-based project to support brain tumor survivors' social involvement by training classmates to be more inclusive of others viewed as "different."

Sean Phipps Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 06-30-2015
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Memphis, TN
Institution: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Dr. Phipps is studying what happens to children who were treated with bone marrow transplant for cancer many years ago. This is a very challenging treatment that can cause problems for survivors in a number of areas, including their thinking and learning ability, their physical health, and their ability to have children. He is learning how these children and young adults are faring relative to their healthy peers, to identify factors that lead to better or poorer outcomes so that researchers can develop treatments to prevent any negative effects.

Gail Tomlinson M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 12-30-2013
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: San Antonio, TX
Institution: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Cancer therapy for childhood leukemia is often successful, but not without side effects. Pancreatitis, characterized by severe abdominal pain and inability to digest food, is a severe side effect seen in some children but not others who are similarly treated for leukemia. This side effect is sometimes fatal, and very often causes significant delays in continuing with treatment. This research is to learn the reasons why some children are more likely to develop this side effect than others, with the goal of helping all patients avoid it.

Fritz Sieber Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 08-30-2013
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Milwaukee, WI
Institution: Medical College of Wisconsin affiliated with Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Midwest Children's Cancer Center

About 80% of children and adolescents diagnosed with cancer become long-term survivors. About half of them develop therapy-induced hearing loss that is cumulative and irreversible. Most at risk are patients with brain tumors, neuroblastomas, osteosarcomas, soft tissue sarcomas, retinoblastomas, hepatoblastomas, or germ cell tumors who need to be treated with cisplatin, combinations of cisplatin and carboplatin, radiation to the head and neck, or combinations of platins and radiation. Therapy-induced hearing loss adversely affects speech and language development, reading ability, communication, academic performance and psychosocial development. It frequently causes stress, social isolation, low self-esteem, and low overall quality of life. This project explores the use of moderate to high doses of dietary selenium as means to reduce or prevent cisplatin-induced hearing loss.

Kathleen Ruccione Ph.D., M.P.H., R.N.
Funded: 07-01-2011 through 06-30-2013
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Los Angeles, CA
Institution: Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Transfusions with packed red blood cells (PRBCs) are commonly used when children treated for cancer develop anemia (low red blood cell count). PRBC transfusions carry iron that can be deposited in various body tissues, such as the heart. The body cannot remove this iron overload by itself, and if it stays in the heart, it can cause damage (cardiomyopathy). At this time, we do not know how often patients have extra iron in their heart after PRBC transfusions. This study uses a magnetic resonance image (MRI) test that can measure iron and learn about other things that might affect the heart, such as anthracycline chemotherapy and what effect iron-related cardiomyopathy has on daily life. The overall goal is to increase the length and quality of survival for people successfully treated for cancer during childhood.

Olga Toro-Salazar M.D. 
Funded: 07-01-2011 through 06-30-2013
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Hartford, CT
Institution: Connecticut Children's Medical Center

Research in the last 30 years has had a wonderful impact on the survival rate of kids with many types of cancers. However, aggressive treatment regimens on children's young bodies have many negative side effects. One class of chemotherapy drugs, anthracyclines, have been used to effectively treat more than 135,000 childhood cancer survivors, but cause significant risk for cardiovascular disease by the time these children reach their 30s. This research will use Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging and chemical markers in the blood to identify heart damage caused by anthracyclines before symptoms begin, thereby reducing long-term life-threatening heart conditions for pediatric cancer survivors.

Sharon Castellino M.D., M.Sc.
Funded: 07-01-2011 through 06-30-2012
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Institution: Wake Forest University Health Sciences affiliated with Brenner Children's Hospital

While currently 70% of children with brain tumors survive beyond 5-years from diagnosis, radiation to the brain and spine are cornerstones of therapy. The cost of this treatment is impaired neuro-cognitive function, premature heart problems, stroke, and impaired quality of life in many. The role of injury to the heart and vascular system from radiation has not been previously studied in childhood brain tumor survivors. While killing tumor cells, radiation may lead to narrowing and stiffening of the vessels in the brain. Stiffening of the aorta is a progressive with normal aging in the lifespan. This project studies stiffness in the aorta and its relation to flow in the vessels in the brain among children who received radiation therapy, a novel attempt to link the heart and the brain following childhood cancer. 

Lauri Linder Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2011 through 10-31-2013
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Institution: University of Utah affiliated with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Adolescents with cancer experience many symptoms resulting from their disease and its treatment. Recognizing and managing these contributes to improved quality of life during treatment and on into survivorship. This study uses an approach that allows adolescents to identify clusters describing their symptom experience from their perspective. The purpose is to develop and test the use of a computer-based tool exploring symptom clusters among adolescents with cancer. The goal of these findings is to provide data to support use of the tool in a larger group of adolescents and to enhance communication between them and healthcare providers.

Kristina Hardy Ph.D., Clinical Psychology
Funded: 09-01-2010 through 12-31-2013
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Washington, DC
Institution: Children's National Medical Center affiliated with George Washington University

Children with brain tumors and acute lymphoblastic leukemia are at risk for developing learning and memory problems as a result of their disease and treatments. Since we currently cannot prevent this, difficulties are addressed after they appear, with only modest improvements. A computerized cognitive training program, easily used at home with little oversight from parents or professionals, has been tested in survivors of pediatric cancer with memory problems; this project tests it on children during treatment, before the problems develop. If effective, the program has considerable potential to improve the quality of life in pediatric cancer patients.

Jonathan Espenschied M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2010 through 12-31-2012
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Duarte, CA
Institution: Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope

Cancer affects every part of patients and their families' lives. Self-image, thinking clearly, anxiety, depression, social isolation and fear of recurrence are all problems that teens and young adults with cancer face, while resuming normal development and being monitored for many problems caused by cancer and its treatment. This research is to create developmentally sensitive information and make it available through touch-screen technology, connecting teens and young adults with their health care team and community resources in real-time. This helps identify, communicate and maximize the benefits of clinical care while helping them reintegrate into school and work.

Jennifer Mack M.D., M.P.H.
Funded: 07-01-2010 through 06-30-2011
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute affiliated with Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Little is known about the long-term impact of communication about prognosis on children with cancer and their families. The goal of this project is to increase parents' ability to make value-driven decisions for care of their children with cancer and to adjust to this life-changing event in the best way possible. A longitudinal observational study evaluates long-term outcomes, using questionnaire-based parent interviews to assess parental decision- making and psychological and medical outcomes of disclosure. The cohort involves 194 children diagnosed between April 2003 and May 2005, so long-term assessment of their outcomes is now possible. Dr. Mack is funded by P.A.L.S. Bermuda with funds raised through the St. Baldrick's Foundation.

Mary Hooke Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2010 through 10-31-2013
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Minneapolis, MN
Institution: Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota affiliated with Children's - St. Paul

Fatigue is a pervasive, distressing symptom for children and teens with cancer. Decreasing fatigue and improving physical activity are important to provide energy for the normal activities of childhood that are important to ongoing development. A small, cost-effective device called the FitBit measures motion and provides daily feedback to the wearer. Children ages 6 to 18 in maintenance treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia use the FitBit, and researchers determine if it is accurate, if it helps childhood cancer patients to be more active, and if more active patients have less fatigue when getting steroids during treatment.

Peter Cole M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2010 through 06-30-2011
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Bronx, NY
Institution: Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University affiliated with Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Montefiore Medical Center

Generously sponsored by Markit. Treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia can be particularly devastating to a child's developing brain, leading to deficient short-term memory and attention or more serious events like seizures or strokes. This research focuses on how the cough medicine dextromethorphan may help reverse severe, stroke-like neurotoxicity among children treated with chemotherapy drug methotrexate and could possibly also prevent such side effects before they occur. The most promising drugs will be rapidly advanced into clinical trials for children with leukemia, designed to decrease the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy.