Showing 21-40 of 177 results
Le Su Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Huntsville, AL
Institution: HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology

Genes instruct cells to do their jobs through making specific proteins. In the human body, all cells store these "instructions" in the chromosomes. When chromosomes break off, the broken pieces sometimes change places and create new chromosomes. These changes are called chromosomal translocations. Dr. Su is studying how chromosomal translocations cause deadly diseases in children and young adults, and more importantly, is investigating possible clinical options to correct these abnormal conditions.

Robert Wechsler-Reya Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: La Jolla, CA
Institution: Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute

Medulloblastoma (MB) is a highly aggressive pediatric brain tumor for which safer and more effective therapies are needed. Recent studies have identified four major forms of MB that differ in terms of molecular characteristics and patient outcomes. Dr. Wechsler-Reya is working to identify genes that drive Group 4 MB tumor formation, the most prevalent form of MB, to develop new strategies for treatment of this devastating disease.

Yong-Mi Kim M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H. 
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Los Angeles, CA
Institution: Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Drug resistance remains a major obstacle in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Instead of targeting only the leukemia cells, Dr. Kim is studying the protective non-leukemia cells that are located in the bone marrow, creating a safe haven for drug-resistant ALL cells. Dr. Kim's team has identified a molecule in leukemia cells that allows leukemia cells to remain in the bone marrow and shelters them from the otherwise toxic effects of chemotherapy. Dr. Kim's Johnny Crisstopher Children’s Charitable Foundation St. Baldrick’s Research Grant is testing a novel inhibitor of this molecule to overcome drug resistance. The mission of the Johnny Crisstopher Children's Charitable Foundation is to raise awareness of pediatric cancer and provide funds for research, treatment, and - ultimately - a cure. Famed illusionist Criss Angel founded the foundation in 2008 for charitable causes but it has now become his life's mission since his son, Johnny Crisstopher was diagnosed with leukemia in 2015 at 20 months old.

Yves DeClerck M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Los Angeles, CA
Institution: Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Neuroblastoma is the second most common solid tumor in children, and is a cancer that frequently metastasizes to the bone marrow. Dr. DeClerck is studying how neuroblastoma cells "teach" bone marrow cells to promote tumor growth.

William Weiss M.D., Ph.D. 
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: San Francisco, CA
Institution: University of California, San Francisco affiliated with UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital

Targeted therapy works by attacking an abnormal gene product that is specific to the cancer type. Only a minority of neuroblastoma types show genetic drivers, which makes it difficult to develop targeted therapy. Most neuroblastomas show too many or too few copies of large chromosomal regions, called CNAs. Dr. Weiss is studying the connection between CNAs and neuroblastoma, to determine if it CNA is a possible candidate for targeted therapy. Dr. Weiss is engineering CNAs to create CNA-driven models of neuroblastoma, which he will then use to identify CNA-specific therapies to treat neuroblastoma.

James DeGregori Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Denver, CO
Institution: University of Colorado affiliated with Children's Hospital Colorado

Progress in improving therapy for Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been slow and survival rates for patients remain quite low. Thus, there is a great need for more effective and less toxic therapies for AML. Dr. DeGregori has identified a new molecule called MCJ, the loss of which is associated with the resistance of cancers to therapies. Dr. DeGregori has developed novel drugs that can restore MCJ function in cancer cells, and is investigating whether these MCJ activating drugs can be used improve therapies for AML.

Sidi Chen Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: New Haven, CT
Institution: Yale University affiliated with Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital

Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor, yet currently has no optimal treatment options. Medulloblastoma has been classified into 4 major subgroups, and Dr. Chen is targeting methylation mutations to develop improved therapeutics for two highly-aggressive subgroups of medulloblastoma. To facilitate this, Dr. Chen is establishing precision models of this disease to screen and test for therapeutics. To systematically identify protein targets required for survival of MB cells, Dr. Chen and colleagues are performing a genome screen to look for possible targets, in order to enhance understanding of this disease and lead to novel therapeutic routes.

Muxiang Zhou M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Atlanta, GA
Institution: Emory University affiliated with Aflac Cancer Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

The interaction between two important cancer-related proteins called MDM4 and TOP2A may cause cancer and contribute to disease progression. Dr. Zhou is studying the regulation of MDM4 and TOP2A to identify small-molecule inhibitors (agents) that can block the MDM4-TOP2A interaction, leading to inhibition of these two proteins. The results of these studies will provide important clues to help scientists develop novel methods and drugs to specifically and simultaneously target TOP2A and MDM4 for treatment of pediatric cancer patients.

Alfred George M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Chicago, IL
Institution: Northwestern University affiliated with Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital

Neuroblastoma is a common type of childhood cancer that arises from nerve-like cells and causes tumors just outside the brain. Dr. George is studying tumor cells from patients to discover new molecular targets for treatment of neuroblastoma. Dr. George and his team are growing tumor cells from patients and examining their electrical properties in order to identify specific proteins that carry electrical current that may be new targets for treating neuroblastoma using existing non-cancer drugs.

Panagiotis Ntziachristos Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Chicago, IL
Institution: Northwestern University affiliated with Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital

Treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using chemoradiation can be successful, but it is difficult to manage treatment-associated side events and secondary cancers. Furthermore, in relapsed/refractory patients, the overall prognosis remains dismal. Direct inhibition of the main proteins promoting cancer (the “oncogenes”) is not successful in ALL. Dr. Ntziachristos's "Just Do It…...and be done with it" St. Baldrick'’s Research Grant will study certain oncogene-supporting mechanisms that might be specific to a diseased state, and not to a healthy state. Dr. Ntziachristos has selected one of these mechanisms to target in ALL models, and is assessing the anti-cancer activity that results. Such experiments could pave the way for clinical trials for high-risk disease. This grant is named for the “"Just Do It...…and be done with it"” Hero Fund created in honor of Sara Martorano who doesn'’t let anything dim her sparkle and has a compassionate heart and smile. It also celebrates the courage of all cancer kids through treatment and the support of their family and friends.

Alan B Cantor M.D. Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: Boston Children's Hospital affiliated with Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an aggressive blood cancer of young children. The only current curative treatment is bone marrow transplantation. Yet, about 50% of children do not survive despite this very aggressive therapy. An improved understanding of the mechanisms that cause JMML is critical to developing new treatments. Dr. Cantor is studying a protein called GATA2, which normally turns on and off white blood cell genes, to determine if it is incorrectly activated in JMML. If so, the results of this project will support development of medicines to inhibit GATA2 for the treatment of JMML.

Darren Roblyer Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: Boston University

Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children. Typical treatment includes cancer-killing drugs for several weeks followed by surgery. These drugs work for some patients but not for others. Doctors need a way to identify which patients respond to treatment and which don’t. Dr. Roblyer is studying the efficacy of a new light-based technology to determine when and if patients respond to treatment. This technology is low-cost, fast, and measurements are taken with a hand-held or wearable probe, like a Fitbit for cancer. If successful, this research will provide doctors with a new and simple method to personalize and improve treatment for each child with osteosarcoma.

Michael Eck M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute affiliated with Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Childhood brain tumors are frequently quite different than those of adults. Dr. Eck's For the Love of Jack St. Baldrick'’s Research Grant aims to find new “targeted” therapies for low-grade astrocytomas (a type of brain tumor) in children that are caused by a mutation in a protein called BRAF. BRAF mutations are common in cancer, and drugs have been developed that are effective in some tumors caused by one type of BRAF mutation. Unfortunately, these drugs do not work on the BRAF mutation found most often in pediatric brain tumors. Dr. Eck is using detailed information about the molecular structure of the BRAF mutation found in pediatric brain tumors to discover new drugs that specifically target this cause of brain tumors in children. Jack Tweedy was diagnosed with brain and spinal cancer when he was two. Since then he has endured multiple surgeries and 270 weeks of chemotherapy but never fails to uplift those around him. Together with his family, he inspires others to help fund the best research to ensure that all cancer warriors have better treatment options.

Rameen Beroukhim M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute affiliated with Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma is a type of incurable brain tumor that affects young children. Despite treatment with radiation and chemotherapy, the tumor exhibits resistance to current treatments and grows back. Dr. Beroukhim is studying the tumors at a single-cell level to determine how they become resistant to treatments, which will help guide the development of combination therapies to improve outcomes. This grant is made with generous support from the McKenna Claire Foundation established by the Wetzel family in memory of their daughter, McKenna. Their mission is to cure pediatric brain cancer by raising awareness, increasing community involvement and funding research.

David Lombard M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Institution: University of Michigan affiliated with C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital

Ewing sarcoma is a cancer of bone and soft tissue in children and young adults, which is fatal if untreated. While often successful, therapies for Ewing sarcoma have severe long-term side effects for survivors. Dr. Lombard is testing a new means of treating Ewing sarcoma, by targeting the mitochondrion, the metabolic hub of the cell. Dr. Lombard and his team have early results to suggest that this new approach may provide a way to efficiently kill Ewing sarcoma cells, with little impact on normal cells and organs. This grant is named for Love Your Melon, an apparel brand dedicated to giving a hat to every child battling cancer in America as well as supporting nonprofit organizations who lead the fight against pediatric cancer.

Daniel Wechsler M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Durham, NC
Institution: Duke University Medical Center affiliated with Duke Children's Hospital & Health Center

Dr. Wechsler and his team study how normal white blood cells turn into leukemia cells. They have discovered that a protein called CRM1 is directly involved in turning on specific genes that cause leukemia to develop. Dr. Wechsler is studying this previously unrecognized function of CRM1 by identifying other proteins that are required for CRM1 to turn on. This research aims to allow Dr. Wechsler to design new drugs that can selectively target leukemia cells and increase cure rates.

Charles Keller M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Beaverton, OR
Institution: Children's Cancer Therapy Development Institute

Relatively little is currently known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of medulloblastoma spread throughout the spinal fluid. Dr. Keller's preliminary findings show that medulloblastoma tumor cells actively migrate to the surface of the covering of the brain and spine, rather than arriving passively. Dr. Keller is investigating the efficacy of stopping the tumor cells from migrating to the brain and spine surfaces, which, if successful, will provide a rationale for future clinical trials.

Steven Vokes Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 05-31-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Austin, TX
Institution: The University of Texas at Austin

Medulloblastoma is formed by mutations that activate the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Dr. Vokes is investigating how the Hedgehog pathway controls the expression of genes through specific control regions of DNA. Dr. Vokes and his team are studying those DNA control regions in medulloblastoma cells, to determine if they can control the expression of target genes, thereby providing a possible therapeutic target for medulloblastoma.

Anne Kirchhoff Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Institution: University of Utah affiliated with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Childhood cancer survivors can have problems with their lungs due to their cancer treatment. Dr. Kirchhoff is completing the first study to examine how air pollution affects the health of childhood cancer survivors.

Hans-Guido Wendel M.D.
Funded: 08-01-2015 through 07-31-2016
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: New York, NY
Institution: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Genetic studies have identified the molecular causes of childhood cancers such as T-cell leukemia and neuroblastoma. A recurrent theme in these cancers is abnormal activation of the MYC gene. Accordingly, researchers like Dr. Wendel have spent much time and effort in trying to identify inhibitors of MYC as they believe these could be very powerful therapies for these childhood cancers. Dr. Wendel and his colleagues recently found a new way to block the production of MYC using a natural compound. The natural product is rare and hard to come by and therefore Dr. Wendel and his colleagues are exploring ways to generate synthetic drugs based on this plant product. With support from the St. Baldrick’s Foundation they are working to bring this new strategy to the clinic. They focus especially on heavily pre-treated and relapsed childhood leukemia because affected children have few options and they hope to make a difference.