Showing 21-40 of 173 results
Pinki Prasad M.D.
Funded: 01-01-2017 through 12-31-2017
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: New Orleans, LA
Institution: Children's Hospital-New Orleans

This grant supports research staff who are developing a Transition Clinic for Adolescents and Young Adults. The grant also supports a Nurse Educator who is dedicated to aiding pediatric and teenage cancer survivors in successfully transitioning to adult health care services.

Robert Vasquez M.D., Ph.D
Funded: 01-01-2017 through 12-31-2017
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: New Orleans, LA
Institution: Ochsner Clinic Foundation affiliated with Ochsner Medical Center

This grant supports a Nurse Coordinator who works with new patients in the combined Adolescent and Young Adult and Cancer Survivor Clinic. The Nurse Coordinator also works as a guide throughout the process of scheduling visits, and provides information and resources throughout the time that the patients attend the Clinic.

Anne-Marie Langevin M.D.
Funded: 01-01-2017 through 12-31-2017
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: San Antonio, TX
Institution: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

This grant supports an Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Navigator who enrolls adolescents and young adults with pediatric-type tumors on clinical trials, often their best hope for a cure.

Dr. Michael J Burke M.D.
Funded: 01-01-2017 through 12-31-2017
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: Milwaukee, WI
Institution: Children's Hospital of Wisconsin affiliated with Medical College of Wisconsin, Midwest Children's Cancer Center

This grant supports Clinical Research Nurses at both Children's Hospital of Wisconsin and the Medical College of Wisconsin, in a joint clinical trials education initiative. The nurses are collaborating on educational strategies and materials focused on cellular and immunotherapies for children, adolescents, and young adults with cancer. These resources will educate patients, families, and healthcare providers on clinical trials in order to enroll more kids on clinical trials, often their best hope for a cure.

David Van Mater M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 12-01-2016 through 11-30-2018
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: Durham, NC
Institution: Duke University Medical Center affiliated with Duke Children's Hospital & Health Center

This grant supports construction of a REDCap database that will capture valuable clinical information on demographics, diagnosis, and treatment information for adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. The grant also supports a Patient Care Navigator who maintains the REDcap database and works to coordinate resources with other departments. This database helps track patients over time, giving more information to researchers and providing better long-term care for childhood cancer survivors.

Richard Drachtman M.D.
Funded: 12-01-2016 through 11-30-2017
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: New Brunswick, NJ
Institution: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

This grant funds a Clinical Research Nurse who will also act as the Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Liaison to ensure that more kids, adolescents, and young adults can be treated on clinical trials, often their best hope for a cure.

Reshmi Parameswaran Ph.D
Funded: 09-01-2016 through 08-31-2019
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Scholar
Institution Location: Cleveland, OH
Institution: Case Western Reserve University

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is the second most common acute leukemia in children, and current treatment strategies are inadequate to cure AML. Dr. Parameswaran is developing a new strategy using Natural Killer cells, which are a type of white blood cells with potential to kill cancer cells. Cancer cells often produce a protein that makes Natural Killer cells less active, which helps the cancer cells escape from NK cell-mediated killing. Dr. Parameswaran and her team are developing methods to stop this NK cell inactivation and thereby improve NK cell function to treat pediatric AML.

Panagiotis Ntziachristos Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Chicago, IL
Institution: Northwestern University affiliated with Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital

Treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) using chemoradiation can be successful, but it is difficult to manage treatment-associated side events and secondary cancers. Furthermore, in relapsed/refractory patients, the overall prognosis remains dismal. Direct inhibition of the main proteins promoting cancer (the “oncogenes”) is not successful in ALL. Dr. Ntziachristos's "Just Do It…...and be done with it" St. Baldrick'’s Research Grant will study certain oncogene-supporting mechanisms that might be specific to a diseased state, and not to a healthy state. Dr. Ntziachristos has selected one of these mechanisms to target in ALL models, and is assessing the anti-cancer activity that results. Such experiments could pave the way for clinical trials for high-risk disease. This grant is named for the “"Just Do It...…and be done with it"” Hero Fund created in honor of Sara Martorano who doesn'’t let anything dim her sparkle and has a compassionate heart and smile. It also celebrates the courage of all cancer kids through treatment and the support of their family and friends.

Darren Roblyer Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: Boston University

Osteosarcoma is the most common bone cancer in children. Typical treatment includes cancer-killing drugs for several weeks followed by surgery. These drugs work for some patients but not for others. Doctors need a way to identify which patients respond to treatment and which don’t. Dr. Roblyer is studying the efficacy of a new light-based technology to determine when and if patients respond to treatment. This technology is low-cost, fast, and measurements are taken with a hand-held or wearable probe, like a Fitbit for cancer. If successful, this research will provide doctors with a new and simple method to personalize and improve treatment for each child with osteosarcoma.

Michael Eck M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute affiliated with Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Childhood brain tumors are frequently quite different than those of adults. Dr. Eck's For the Love of Jack St. Baldrick'’s Research Grant aims to find new “targeted” therapies for low-grade astrocytomas (a type of brain tumor) in children that are caused by a mutation in a protein called BRAF. BRAF mutations are common in cancer, and drugs have been developed that are effective in some tumors caused by one type of BRAF mutation. Unfortunately, these drugs do not work on the BRAF mutation found most often in pediatric brain tumors. Dr. Eck is using detailed information about the molecular structure of the BRAF mutation found in pediatric brain tumors to discover new drugs that specifically target this cause of brain tumors in children. Jack Tweedy was diagnosed with brain and spinal cancer when he was two. Since then he has endured multiple surgeries and 270 weeks of chemotherapy but never fails to uplift those around him. Together with his family, he inspires others to help fund the best research to ensure that all cancer warriors have better treatment options.

Nicolas Llosa M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2019
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Scholar
Institution Location: Baltimore, MD
Institution: Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine affiliated with Johns Hopkins Children's Center

Osteosarcoma is a tumor that forms in the bones and is the most common bone tumor of childhood. Dr. Llosa is investigating how the immune system interacts with cancer cells from osteosarcoma tumors. Dr. Llosa's focus is on immunotherapy, a type of cancer treatment designed to boost the body's natural defenses to fight the cancer, and one of the most promising current approaches for treating tumors. Immunotherapy uses materials either made by the body or in a laboratory to improve or restore immune system function with the final goal of stopping the growth of tumors. Dr. Llosa is studying the immune microenvironment of metastatic osteosarcomas to assess their potential for checkpoint blockade (where immune responses are allowed through an checkpoint in malignant cells in order to fight the cancer) as a therapeutic option. This grant is made with generous support from the Ethan Jostad Foundation, established by Kim and Chris Jostad in 2011 in memory of their son, Ethan, who was taken by Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma at the age of nine. In addition to funding cutting-edge pediatric cancer research, the foundation'’s mission is to provide emotional and financial support to children and families impacted by the disease.

Nora Nock Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Cleveland, OH
Institution: Case Western Reserve University

Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer have an increased risk of developing secondary cancers, cardiovascular, metabolic and bone diseases as well as cognitive impairments, which can reduce their survival and quality of life. Furthermore, most AYA cancer survivors do not meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity. Dr. Nock is conducting a pilot study using 'cybercycling' (stationary cycling with interactive video gaming) to improve quality of life in AYA cancer survivors. She will also see if this exercise program improves their motivation to exercise, body composition (weight, body fat), fatigue, depression, and sleep habits.

Ryan Roberts M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2019
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Scholar
Institution Location: Columbus, OH
Institution: Nationwide Children's Hospital affiliated with The Research Institute at Nationwide

Dr. Roberts is focused on developing new treatments for patients with metastatic bone tumors. These tumors, once they have spread to the lungs, are incredibly difficult to treat. Dr. Roberts and his team will study the pathways that proteins move between osteosarcoma cancer cells and lung tissues. These experiments are helping Dr. Roberts and his team to better understand the biology that lets those tumors grow in the lung and will evaluate treatments which might prevent metastases from growing, and make them treatable when they do.

Roderick O'Sullivan Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2019
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Scholar
Institution Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Institution: University of Pittsburgh affiliated with Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh

Telomeres are special sequences of DNA located at the ends of every chromosome, and are essential to maintaining proper cellular function. If telomeres are damaged or degraded, they may cause healthy cells to transform into cancer cells. Dr. O'Sullivan and his team have discovered a protein called RAD51AP1 that appears at high levels in neuroblastoma tumor cells, and they have determined that having less of this protein stops telomere damage in cells. Dr. O'Sullivan is investigating the consequences and impact of RAD51AP1 inhibition on the proliferation and survival of neuroblastoma tumor cells.

Elizabeth Stewart M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2019
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Scholar
Institution Location: Memphis, TN
Institution: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Pediatric cancer patients that have high-risk solid tumors can be very difficult to treat, particularly when their cancer has come back after previous treatment or has spread to multiple areas of the body. Dr. Stewart is looking for specific mutations in the tumors of these patients, and testing new cancer drugs to customize treatment to give patients with relapsed high-risk solid tumors with better treatment options. This grant is made with generous support from the Invictus Fund which was created in memory of Holden Gilkinson. It honors Holden'’s unconquerable spirit in his battle with bilateral Wilms tumor by funding cures and treatments to mitigate side and late effects of childhood cancer.

Charles G. Mullighan M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2019
Funding Type: Robert J. Arceci Innovation Award
Institution Location: Memphis, TN
Institution: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a tumor of white blood cells that normally fight infection. Changes in DNA, or mutations, are important in driving the development of ALL. Mutations in genes that control the reading of DNA are particularly common in leukemia cells that don't respond to treatment. Dr. Mullighan is studying engineered ALL cells and tumors to understand how these mutations result in resistance to therapy, and to develop new ways of treating ALL. The St. Baldrick’s Robert J. Arceci Innovation Award is given in honor of the late Dr. Robert Arceci. A pioneer in the field, this award reflects Dr. Arceci’s values including creativity, collaboration, and commitment to early- to mid-career scientists.

Steven Vokes Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Austin, TX
Institution: The University of Texas at Austin

Medulloblastoma is formed by mutations that activate the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Dr. Vokes is investigating how the Hedgehog pathway controls the expression of genes through specific control regions of DNA. Dr. Vokes and his team are studying those DNA control regions in medulloblastoma cells, to determine if they can control the expression of target genes, thereby providing a possible therapeutic target for medulloblastoma.

Suzanne Ameringer Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Richmond, VA
Institution: Virginia Commonwealth University affiliated with Children's Hospital of Richmond at VCU

Unrelieved symptoms lead to poorer quality of life for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. Strategies are needed to help AYAs manage symptoms. Dr. Ameringer and her team have developed the Computerized Symptom Capture Tool (C-SCAT), a novel way to assess symptoms where AYAs create a picture of their symptoms using images and text on an app. Dr. Ameringer is testing whether use of the C-SCAT improves the self-management of symptoms and patient-provider communication about symptoms in AYAs with cancer. Dr. Ameringer's findings will inform a larger trial of the C-SCAT as a strategy to improve AYA symptom self-management, and in turn, quality of life.

Theodore B. Moore M.D.
Funded: 01-01-2016 through 12-31-2016
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: Los Angeles, CA
Institution: University of California, Los Angeles affiliated with Mattel Children's Hospital

This grant supports a Clinical Research Associate to ensure that more Adolescent and Young Adults can be treated on clinical trials, often their best hope for a cure.

James Martin Johnston M.D.
Funded: 01-01-2016 through 12-31-2017
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: Savannah, GA
Institution: Children's Hospital at Memorial University Medical Center

This grant supports a dedicated Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) cancer program at Memorial Health University Medical Center, to ensure that more kids can be treated on clinical trials, often their best hope for a cure.