Showing 1-20 of 173 results
Kellie Haworth M.D.
Funded: 11-01-2017 through 10-31-2020
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Scholar
Institution Location: Memphis, TN
Institution: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Do you ever get a cold sore on your lip, or know someone who does? That sore is caused by a virus that destroys the cells in your lip. As the virus spreads, the sore gets bigger. Viruses are great at killing cells and spreading. But, the sore eventually goes away because the immune system attacks the infected cells, killing them and stopping the viral infection, allowing your lip to heal. Imagine if we could get both the virus and the immune system to kill cancer cells instead of lip cells! Previously Dr. Haworth's team used a safe version of the cold sore virus to infect a common type of hard-to-treat childhood cancer cells. The virus directly killed cancer cells and caused the immune system to attack the cancer cells that the virus missed. Dr. Haworth's team is testing ways to make the virus and immune system work better together. Dr. Haworth is infecting model tumors with the virus, and giving immune cells designed to attack the tumor, hypothesizing that giving both virus and immune cells will cure the tumor. Awarded at The Research Institute at Nationwide and transferred to St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium Member
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Orange, CA
Institution: Children's Hospital of Orange County

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Theresa Keegan Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Sacramento, CA
Institution: University of California, Davis School of Medicine affiliated with UC Davis Children's Hospital

Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors have an elevated risk of medical problems that can impact the quality and length of their lives, but few studies have focused on the occurrence of late medical conditions in this population. Using data on nearly all AYA cancer survivors in California, the Rich and Weissman Family Lymphoma Survivorship Fund St. Baldrick's Research Grant is identifying how often specific late medical conditions occur and how the risk of these medical conditions vary by clinical and patient factors. The results of the study will identify subgroups of young patients at increased risk of serious medical conditions, information critical to improving survivorship care and outcomes. Jared Weissman is a Hodgkin’s lymphoma survivor thanks to a clinical trial made possible by research. This Hero Fund honors his survivorship and his grandparents, Terri and Barry Rich, by funding research for new treatment options for cures and less toxic after effects for survivors.

Jordan Gilleland Marchak Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Atlanta, GA
Institution: Emory University affiliated with Aflac Cancer Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

Children and adolescents with cancer and their families are at increased risk for psychosocial problems that can contribute to poorer health and quality of life, and it has been recommended that pediatric cancer centers develop programs to screen patients and families for psychosocial risk. The majority of pediatric cancers centers do not have practices in place to effectively and routinely screen all patients and families for psychosocial difficulties, with time and resources being acknowledged as barriers to implementation. Dr. Gilleland Marchak is developing a novel, patient-friendly technology to screen for psychosocial risk and evaluating its use at a large pediatric cancer center. Study outcomes will include data related to feasibility and acceptability of electronic screening, as well as efficacy in identifying families in distress and connecting them with family support team members to address problems in real time. By successfully leveraging technology to reduce barriers to universal psychosocial screening, we can improve communication between oncology providers and families regarding critical mental health, neurocognitive, and social issues that may negatively impact pediatric cancer treatment and health outcomes.

Hazel Nichols Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2020
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Scholar
Institution Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Institution: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill affiliated with UNC Children's Hospital

Women who are diagnosed with cancer before 40 are often concerned about whether they will be able to have children in the future. Women can freeze their eggs or embryos (called fertility preservation) to help protect their fertility, but these services may not be widely available. Dr. Nichols has looked at how often women in North Carolina have children after cancer treatment and whether the health of their babies is different from women without cancer. She is further examining the use of fertility preservation after diagnosis and its association with birth rates and outcomes. This research will provide information to improve the long-term health of AYAs with cancer.

Luisa Cimmino Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2020
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Scholar
Institution Location: New York, NY
Institution: New York University School of Medicine affiliated with NYU Langone Medical Center

Vitamin C is essential for maintaining healthy hair, skin, immune system and heart function. In addition to these health benefits, Dr. Cimmino and team propose that vitamin C might be a non-toxic therapeutic for the treatment of patients with pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. Recently, it was discovered that vitamin C enhances the activation of a group of enzymes called TET proteins that are required for normal blood development. A significant fraction of children and young adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia have mutations in TET2, causing impaired TET2 activity and a block in normal blood cell formation. However, only one of the two copies of the TET2 gene is defective in these patients. Dr. Cimmino's team is working to determine if treatment with high-dose vitamin C could enhance the activity of the remaining, non-mutant, TET2 protein, kill leukemia cells and restore normal blood development. Alternative therapies such as treatment with vitamin C might provide a safe and effective strategy to improve outcome for pediatric leukemia patients.

Emily Bernstein Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: New York, NY
Institution: Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai affiliated with Kravis Children’s Hospital at Mount Sinai

Neurons are nerve cells that populate certain regions of the human body and are responsible for transmitting chemical signals back and forth to the brain to regulate critical bodily functions. A deadly form of pediatric cancer, known as neuroblastoma, occurs when a subset of these neurons start to proliferate uncontrollably. These cancer cells can migrate and spread throughout the body, making it very challenging to treat with currently available drugs. This highly aggressive form of neuroblastoma occurs in children who are older than 18 months. At such an early age, this disease can be quite devastating and there is an imperative need to better understand how this form of neuroblastoma develops. Recent work has identified pediatric cancer mutations in distinct specialized proteins that regulate chromatin (the complex of DNA and proteins), known as chromatin remodelers. One such protein, ATRX, was recently found to be mutated frequently in neuroblastoma tumors identified in adolescent and young adults, which have poor overall survival. Dr. Bernstein is exploring a novel therapy for neuroblastoma patients that harbor ATRX mutations thorough innovative and state-of-the-art approaches. Dr. Bernstein's team is comparing the cellular changes that occur in the presence of the drug in models of neuroblastoma.

Guangheng Li M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Beaverton, OR
Institution: Children's Cancer Therapy Development Institute

Rhabdomyosarcoma is a deadly cancer when spread through the body. With the Aiden's Army Fund St. Baldrick's Research Grant, Dr. Li is combining drugs already FDA approved for adult cancers in a way that stops rhabdomyosarcoma tumor cells from creating new tumors elsewhere in the body. This approach is unique because Dr. Li not only aims to stop the tumor cells from growing, but will try to convert what is left to non-cancerous cells similar to what is found in normal muscle. This grant is named for Aiden Binkley who was diagnosed with Stage IV rhabdomyosarcoma at age 8. This bright, funny and courageous little boy believed he got cancer so he could grow up to find a cure for it. His vision is being carried on by Aiden’s Army through the funding of research. They will march until there is a cure!

Andrei Thomas-Tikhonenko Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Philadelphia, PA
Institution: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia affiliated with University of Pennsylvania

All proteins in our bodies are made using assembly instructions contained in messenger RNAs, or mRNA. mRNA molecules themselves are constructed from building blocks called exons. When exons are joined together, or “spliced”, out of order, the resulting protein code is scrambled. This is what causes several types of leukemias in older adults. We have discovered that incorrect splicing also occurs with high frequency in childhood leukemias originating in antibody-producing B-cells. Dr. Thomas-Tikhonenko is testing two ideas. The first is that incorrect splicing is needed to sustain uncontrolled multiplication of leukemic cells. The second is that restoring proper exon assembly with specific drugs would slow down or block cancerous growth. If successful, these studies could pave the way to new clinical trials and improved survival of children with leukemia.

Janet Deatrick Ph.D., FAAN
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Philadelphia, PA
Institution: University of Pennsylvania affiliated with The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Dr. Deatrick is developing family support and education materials for maternal caregivers of young adult survivors of childhood brain tumors to improve their quality of life and quality of life of the survivors. Training in Problem Solving (TIPS) for Caregivers, leverages past research, eHealth, and Bright IDEAS family problem-solving intervention (an evidence-based intervention for caregivers of children newly diagnosed with cancer) to target challenges identified by maternal caregivers to their family management. TIPS is targeted to caregivers with “condition-focused FM” (family life organized around the special needs of the survivor). Using the prototype session developed in partnership with maternal caregivers, Dr. Deatrick will work with them to design the web-based intervention. She will develop other sessions of TIPS and adapt them to technology, which will be used “live” online with a health care provider and online with interactive homework sheets, videos, and other resources. Future research will involve fathers and other caregivers, survivors, and other family members.

Gary Kohanbash Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2020
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Scholar
Institution Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Institution: Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh affiliated with University of Pittsburgh

Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children, and ependymomas are the third most common kind. Recent studies have shown that “educating” the patient’s own immune system to fight cancers – immunotherapy – can be safe and effective. Dr. Kohanbash's team has identified three peptides that might activate immune cells to specifically fight one of the more lethal types of ependymoma. Dr. Kohanbash is testing these peptides in the lab. He is also looking at how immunotherapy could help fight all six types of ependymoma that affect kids, and thus is studying relevant characteristics in the largest-ever series of pediatric ependymoma tumors as well as in ependymoma patients already participating in a clinical trial of a vaccine based on another peptide. This grant is generously supported by the Henry Cermak Fund for Pediatric Cancer Research which was created in memory of a brave boy who had an amazing spirit throughout his battle with a brain tumor. This fund is dedicated to Henry’s wish that “no one gets left out.”

Heather Wilson-Robles DVM
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: College Station, TX
Institution: Texas A&M AgriLife Research

Cancer is a genetic disease in which a cell learns to take advantage of certain processes that allow that cell to grow and survive unchecked. Bone cancer is an aggressive disease in both children and pet dogs that can be painful and often leads to death of the patient even with aggressive surgery and chemotherapy. Most often these patients die because the tumor has spread to other areas of the body, not from the original bone tumor, which is often removed with surgery. Therefore, in order to better battle this disease, new therapies that target the cells that spread are needed. Preliminary work with a new drug that targets this process has shown promise as just such a therapy. The goal of The Ben's Green Drakkoman St. Baldrick's Research Grant is to more thoroughly investigate this drug for its ability to prevent or delay spread of the tumor cells using both human and dog bone tumor cells. This grant is named for the Ben's Green Drakkoman Fund, created to honor the memory of Ben Stowell who battled osteosarcoma with an inspiring determination to live life fully. The fund is named after a super hero Ben created named the Green Drakkoman who defeats his enemy, the Evil Alien.

Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium Member
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Dallas, TX
Institution: University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium Member
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: El Paso, TX
Institution: Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center - El Paso

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium Member
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Ft. Worth, TX
Institution: Cook Children's Medical Center

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Houston, TX
Institution: Baylor College of Medicine affiliated with Texas Children's Hospital, Vannie E. Cook Jr. Children's Cancer and Hematology Clinic

While great strides have been made in treating children with acute leukemia, some children continue to do poorly. For example, children of Hispanic ethnicity are at greater risk of both relapse and treatment-related complications. The Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium will expand and enhance an established network of childhood cancer centers, with the goal of tackling ethnic outcome disparities by generating an unmatched resource of clinical information and biological samples. This information will be used to predict those who have the greatest risk of poor outcomes, with a focus on those of Hispanic ethnicity, to improve prevention and treatment strategies.

Jade Wulff M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2019
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Houston, TX
Institution: Baylor College of Medicine affiliated with Texas Children's Hospital, Vannie E. Cook Jr. Children's Cancer and Hematology Clinic

Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the second most common bone cancer in children. Approximately 25% of children with ES have metastasis, which are tumors that have spread to other parts of the body, such as the lungs. It is especially difficult to treat these children and more than 70% die within 5 years. Therefore, it is important to learn about what it is that allows these tumors to spread and hopefully develop new drugs to treat these patients. Certain proteins are expressed at much higher levels in metastatic lung tumors compared to the primary bone tumor, suggesting that these proteins play a role in allowing the tumor to spread. As the Team Clarkie Fund St. Baldrick's Fellow, Dr. Wulff is studying the role of these proteins by increasing or decreasing them, and then testing how this affects the cancer’s ability to grow and spread. Dr. Wulff's team thinks that the cancer’s ability to spread can be decreased by decreasing a particular set of proteins. In addition, she is testing new drugs that inhibit the function of these proteins, with the hope to identify new therapies that will improve overall survival rates for patients with metastatic ES. Clarkie Carroll was diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma in his upper right femur in 2013. He endured surgery and treatments with strength, positivity and a sense of humor. Today he has no evidence of disease. A portion of this grant is funded by the Team Clarkie Fund, created to honor Clarkie and ensure researchers have the resources to further Ewing’s sarcoma research as well as stimulate greater awareness and inspire others to believe pediatric cancer research can and will lead to a cure.

Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium Member
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: McAllen, TX
Institution: Vannie E. Cook Jr. Children's Cancer and Hematology Clinic affiliated with Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium Member
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: San Antonio, TX
Institution: Children's Hospital of San Antonio

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Reducing Ethnic Disparities in Acute Leukemia (REDIAL) Consortium. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

Kevin Jones M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Salt Lake City, UT
Institution: University of Utah affiliated with Huntsman Cancer Institute

Synovial sarcoma is a soft-tissue cancer in adolescents and young adults. More than half of patients develop metastasis, or spread of the cancer to the lungs. Once it has metastasized, synovial sarcoma is fatal in nearly all patients. Dr. Jones' team has developed a model of synovial sarcoma and found that when the tumor spread to the lungs many white blood cells begin to infiltrate the tumors. He is studying whether these particular white blood cells from the immune system are trying to fight the tumor or are helping the tumor grow and spread to the lungs. This team is testing if the presence of these immune cells in a large panel of human synovial sarcomas are associated with the same patients developing clinical spread of disease.