Showing 21-40 of 61 results
Celeste Phillips-Salimi Ph.D., RN, CPON
Funded: 07-01-2013 through 12-31-2016
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Indianapolis, IN
Institution: Indiana University affiliated with IU Health Proton Therapy Center, Riley Hospital for Children

The project involves creating a web application that will generate computerized tailored resilience profiles for adolescents and young adults with cancer (AYA) and their parents. The tailored resilience profiles will summarize meaningful of information regarding the AYAs' and parents' strengths and areas that could be improved. The overall goal is to give them information to help them achieve a sense of resilience during cancer treatment. Resilience means a person feels a sense of confidence and well-being in the midst of a life-threatening illness. Fostering resilience during the cancer experience leads to improve quality of life.

Cheryl Gibson Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2013 through 06-30-2016
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Kansas City, KS
Institution: University of Kansas Medical Center

Nutrition experts recommend that pediatric cancer survivors eat more fruits, vegetables, and whole grain products, and to lead active lifestyles. However, studies suggest that childhood cancer survivors are at risk for excessive weight gain and poor fitness. Strategies to enhance the nutritional quality of diets and to promote physical activity among cancer survivors are greatly needed. This study assesses the feasibility of healthy lifestyle coaching by group televideo conferencing to encourage healthy lifestyle modifications.

Kira Bona M.D., M.P.H.
Funded: 07-01-2013 through 06-30-2016
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute affiliated with Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Based on progress to date, Dr. Bona was awarded a new grant in 2015 to fund an optional third year of this fellowship. The goal of this research is to identify social factors that contribute to childhood cancer mortality, and symptoms and suffering during treatment. While we know that poverty is associated with poor health in pediatric primary care and children with chronic illness, we don't know how poverty impacts the health of children with cancer. Dr. Bona will develop a screening tool which can be used to identify childhood cancer families at-risk for material hardship, and to study the relationship between poverty and childhood cancer outcomes, with the ultimate goal of designing ways to improve pediatric cancer outcomes related to poverty.

Etan Orgel MD
Funded: 01-01-2013 through 12-31-2013
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: Long Beach, CA
Institution: Jonathan Jaques Children's Cancer Center affiliated with Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed), Miller Children's Hospital

This grant funds a Clinical Research Associate to further develop and enhance the supportive care program within the research department.

Sharon Bober Ph.D.
Funded: 10-01-2012 through 09-30-2014
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute affiliated with Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

While most childhood cancer patients no longer die from cancer, young adult survivors of childhood cancer face enormously distressing side effects from their life-saving treatments. These include severe sexual and reproductive problems. Currently, no support is available to help educate young adult survivors about how to manage treatment-related sexual problems and fertility-related distress. This project aims to develop and deliver the first sexual health educational intervention for young adult survivors. This research can make a significantly positive impact on the quality of life for thousands of young adult cancer survivors who are struggling and in need of support.

Health Effects after Anthracycline and Radiation Therapy (HEART Study) – A Children’s Oncology Group Study– - Consortium Member
Funded: 09-01-2012 through 08-31-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Duarte, CA
Institution: Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Preventing Heart Injury During Cancer Treatment. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

Health Effects after Anthracycline and Radiation Therapy (HEART Study) – A Children’s Oncology Group Study– - Consortium Member
Funded: 09-01-2012 through 08-31-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Los Angeles, CA
Institution: University of Southern California

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Preventing Heart Injury During Cancer Treatment. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

Health Effects after Anthracycline and Radiation Therapy (HEART Study) – A Children’s Oncology Group Study– - Consortium Member
Funded: 09-01-2012 through 08-31-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Miami, FL
Institution: Miller School of Medicine of The University of Miami affiliated with Holtz Children's Hospital

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Preventing Heart Injury During Cancer Treatment. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

Health Effects after Anthracycline and Radiation Therapy (HEART Study) – A Children’s Oncology Group Study– - Consortium Member
Funded: 09-01-2012 through 08-31-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Institution: University of Michigan affiliated with C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Preventing Heart Injury During Cancer Treatment. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

Health Effects after Anthracycline and Radiation Therapy (HEART Study) – A Children’s Oncology Group Study– - Consortium Member
Funded: 09-01-2012 through 08-31-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Detroit, MI
Institution: Wayne State University affiliated with Children's Hospital of Michigan

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Preventing Heart Injury During Cancer Treatment. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

Health Effects after Anthracycline and Radiation Therapy (HEART Study) – A Children’s Oncology Group Study– - Consortium Member
Funded: 09-01-2012 through 08-31-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Rochester, NY
Institution: University of Rochester affiliated with Golisano Children's Hospital, Rochester, Strong Memorial Hospital

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Preventing Heart Injury During Cancer Treatment. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

Health Effects after Anthracycline and Radiation Therapy (HEART Study) – A Children’s Oncology Group Study– - Consortium Member
Funded: 09-01-2012 through 08-31-2017
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Philadelphia, PA
Institution: Children's Oncology Group

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Preventing Heart Injury During Cancer Treatment. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

Health Effects after Anthracycline and Radiation Therapy (HEART Study) – A Children’s Oncology Group Study– - Consortium Member
Funded: 09-01-2012 through 08-31-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Providence, RI
Institution: Brown University

This institution is a member of a research consortium which is being funded by St. Baldrick's: Preventing Heart Injury During Cancer Treatment. For a description of this project, see the consortium grant made to the lead institution: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA.

Health Effects after Anthracycline and Radiation Therapy (HEART Study) – A Children’s Oncology Group Study– - Consortium
Funded: 09-01-2012 through 08-31-2018
Funding Type: Consortium Research Grant
Institution Location: Seattle, WA
Institution: Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center affiliated with Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington

Children with cancer can often be successfully treated with chemotherapy drugs that can unfortunately damage the heart in the process. Development of an effective method to prevent this type of injury while curing the cancer is very important. This consortium's goal is to give children successfully cured of cancer the greatest chance of having a completely healthy life afterwards, free of treatment-related side effects. The study is to determine whether a drug called dexrazoxane, which appears to be safe and effective in adults in preventing chemotherapy-related heart injury, can be similarly safe and effective when used in children. Funds administered by Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Joanne Wolfe M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 06-30-2014
Funding Type: Research Grant
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute affiliated with Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Children with advanced cancer experience significant suffering. To improve their comfort, Dr. Wolfe aims to understand how distressing symptoms are evaluated and treated, and also to identify attitudes and behaviors in clinicians and families that may interfere with optimal symptom control. To do so, this project is carefully following what happens when a child reports high distress from pain and other common symptoms during clinic visits, as well as interview providers and families, and review charts. The results will help researchers improve symptom control and will be used to design the PediQUEST Champions intervention aimed at easing suffering in children with cancer. This research is funded by P.A.L.S. Bermuda with funds raised through the St. Baldrick's Foundation.

Peter Cole M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 06-30-2014
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Bronx, NY
Institution: Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University affiliated with Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Montefiore Medical Center

Although most children with leukemia can be cured, chemotherapy frequently causes permanent brain dysfunction in survivors. With previous support from St. Baldricks, Dr. Cole's lab identified promising protective interventions, and he will now test them among those children at greatest risk for brain damage. To identify this population researchers are studying whether variation in neurocognitive function among leukemia survivors is related to specific inherited differences in genes related to repair mechanisms or to metabolism of drugs thought to cause cognitive deficits.

Lisa Schwartz Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 12-31-2014
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Philadelphia, PA
Institution: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia affiliated with University of Pennsylvania

Even though more and more children are being cured of cancer, the treatment can cause major life-long health problems for survivors. Unfortunately, most adult survivors don't seek appropriate medical care to monitor and care for these problems. This project is to study whether or not adult survivors referred to adult-focused follow-up care actually engage in such care and what might get in the way of doing so. The results of the study will help medical providers better prepare young adult survivors to engage in adult-focused follow-up care to assure that they stay as healthy as possible.

Robert Noll Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 06-30-2014
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Institution: University of Pittsburgh affiliated with Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh

Having friends is vitally important for all children. Children surviving brain tumors often have physical problems (jerky movements, slurred speech, etc.) and cognitive delays caused by their disease or treatment. These cancer survivors are frequently described by peers as "not well liked," "having few friends" and "isolated". This puts them at risk for being bullied, dropping out of school, becoming anxious or depressed, and being less likely to marry or have good jobs as adults. Dr. Noll is conducting a research-backed, school-based project to support brain tumor survivors' social involvement by training classmates to be more inclusive of others viewed as "different."

Sean Phipps Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 06-30-2015
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Memphis, TN
Institution: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Dr. Phipps is studying what happens to children who were treated with bone marrow transplant for cancer many years ago. This is a very challenging treatment that can cause problems for survivors in a number of areas, including their thinking and learning ability, their physical health, and their ability to have children. He is learning how these children and young adults are faring relative to their healthy peers, to identify factors that lead to better or poorer outcomes so that researchers can develop treatments to prevent any negative effects.

Gail Tomlinson M.D., Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2012 through 12-30-2013
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: San Antonio, TX
Institution: University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio

Cancer therapy for childhood leukemia is often successful, but not without side effects. Pancreatitis, characterized by severe abdominal pain and inability to digest food, is a severe side effect seen in some children but not others who are similarly treated for leukemia. This side effect is sometimes fatal, and very often causes significant delays in continuing with treatment. This research is to learn the reasons why some children are more likely to develop this side effect than others, with the goal of helping all patients avoid it.