Showing 1-20 of 61 results
Wendy Woods-Swafford M.D., M.P.H.
Funded: 01-01-2018 through 12-31-2018
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: Des Moines, IA
Institution: Blank Children's Hospital

This grant supports an oncology social worker to support families and ensure that more kids can be treated on clinical trials, often their best hope for a cure.

Corey Falcon M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2019
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Birmingham, AL
Institution: University of Alabama at Birmingham affiliated with Children's of Alabama

ALL is the most common blood cancer occurring in children. Great strides have been made in the treatment of this disease, but new less toxic therapies for high risk ALL are needed. A new effective therapy is chimeric antigen receptor T-cells (CAR-T) which involves altering a patient’s own cancer fighting cells (T-cells) to express a protein able to recognize a protein on ALL cells (CD19), thus promoting killing of ALL cells. This form of therapy is much less toxic than traditional chemotherapy, but it is still associated with unwanted side effects. Dr. Falcon is working on ways to eliminate anti-CD19 CAR-T if severe side effects occur. This will greatly enhance the safety of this promising treatment. A portion of this grant is generously supported by the Not All Who Wander Are Lost Fund which was named after Kiersten Dickson’s favorite quote from J.R.R. Tolkien and honors the memory of a free spirited, courageous young woman who battled a rare, incurable cancer. This fund hopes to advance cutting edge immunotherapy treatments for pediatric cancers.

Andrea Orsey M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Hartford, CT
Institution: Connecticut Children's Medical Center

The survival rates of pediatric cancers have dramatically improved over the past 40 years due to aggressive treatment regimens, which have side effects. Anthracyclines are one class of chemotherapy drugs that have been used to treat more than 190,000 childhood cancer survivors but cause risk of cardiovascular disease. Connecticut Children's team of oncologists, cardiologists and endocrinologists has developed a clinical practice guidelines to prevent and recognize early cardiovascular disease in pediatric cancer survivors. Dr. Orsey is testing their scoring system among childhood cancer patients from a database and in the clinic. She anticipates that the scoring system will allow doctors to standardize the way they treat patients so that cardiovascular disease is prevented or recognized and treated early in order to decrease heart disease in childhood cancer survivors.

Jordan Gilleland Marchak Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Atlanta, GA
Institution: Emory University affiliated with Aflac Cancer Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta

Children and adolescents with cancer and their families are at increased risk for psychosocial problems that can contribute to poorer health and quality of life, and it has been recommended that pediatric cancer centers develop programs to screen patients and families for psychosocial risk. The majority of pediatric cancers centers do not have practices in place to effectively and routinely screen all patients and families for psychosocial difficulties, with time and resources being acknowledged as barriers to implementation. Dr. Gilleland Marchak is developing a novel, patient-friendly technology to screen for psychosocial risk and evaluating its use at a large pediatric cancer center. Study outcomes will include data related to feasibility and acceptability of electronic screening, as well as efficacy in identifying families in distress and connecting them with family support team members to address problems in real time. By successfully leveraging technology to reduce barriers to universal psychosocial screening, we can improve communication between oncology providers and families regarding critical mental health, neurocognitive, and social issues that may negatively impact pediatric cancer treatment and health outcomes.

Kathy Ruble Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Baltimore, MD
Institution: Johns Hopkins Children's Center affiliated with Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Children treated for leukemia often have difficulty with school and learning. These children are also known to report sleep disturbances. With the MaxLove Project Fund St. Baldrick's Supportive Care Research Grant, Dr. Ruble is measuring sleep with a home monitor, and testing survivors for specific learning difficulties. She will then examine the relationship between sleep and cognitive function in this population. Dr. Ruble hopes in the future that this will allow researchers to design treatments for sleep disturbances that will ultimately help with learning and school. The MaxLove Project Fund honors the survivorship journey of Max Wilford who was diagnosed with a brain stem tumor at the age of four. Despite several surgeries and an intense treatment protocol, Max is now able to be a “regular” kid due in large part to integrative therapies he received.

Taryn Allen Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Bethesda, MD
Institution: National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health affiliated with NIH Clinical Center

Children diagnosed with brain tumors and their parents have many challenges when there is little hope for a cure. Research shows that children who have an incurable brain tumor and their parents are stressed, less happy with their lives, and in poorer health when compared to healthy children and their parents, yet no known helpful coping strategies have been developed for this brain tumor population. Mindfulness exercises are a type of coping tool that help people pay attention to the present moment and handle difficult emotions that come up when facing very stressful life events. In particular, mindfulness exercises have been shown to improve quality of life in children and adults with terminal illness. With the MaxLove Project Fund St. Baldrick's Supportive Care Research Grant, Dr. Allen is evaluating a new coping program using age-appropriate mindfulness activities to improve the quality of life of children diagnosed with an incurable brain tumor and their families. Coping interventions are greatly needed for this population. The MaxLove Project Fund honors the survivorship journey of Max Wilford who was diagnosed with a brain stem tumor at the age of four. Despite several surgeries and an intense treatment protocol, Max is now able to be a “regular” kid due in large part to integrative therapies he received.

Hilary Marusak Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Detroit, MI
Institution: Wayne State University affiliated with Children's Hospital of Michigan

Cancer-related pain greatly compromises quality of life, and can increase disease morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs by reducing children's compliance to medical procedures. The burden of cancer-related pain does not end when treatment concludes: many survivors of childhood cancer report cancer-related pain well into adulthood. Thus, there is a critical need for interventions that can reduce pain during and after children's treatments for cancer. Dr. Marusak is testing whether a martial arts therapy that centers around mindful breathing and meditative techniques can reduce pain and the underlying brain mechanisms in young cancer patients and survivors.

Janet Deatrick Ph.D., FAAN
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Philadelphia, PA
Institution: University of Pennsylvania affiliated with The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Dr. Deatrick is developing family support and education materials for maternal caregivers of young adult survivors of childhood brain tumors to improve their quality of life and quality of life of the survivors. Training in Problem Solving (TIPS) for Caregivers, leverages past research, eHealth, and Bright IDEAS family problem-solving intervention (an evidence-based intervention for caregivers of children newly diagnosed with cancer) to target challenges identified by maternal caregivers to their family management. TIPS is targeted to caregivers with “condition-focused FM” (family life organized around the special needs of the survivor). Using the prototype session developed in partnership with maternal caregivers, Dr. Deatrick will work with them to design the web-based intervention. She will develop other sessions of TIPS and adapt them to technology, which will be used “live” online with a health care provider and online with interactive homework sheets, videos, and other resources. Future research will involve fathers and other caregivers, survivors, and other family members.

Naomi Winick M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2017 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Dallas, TX
Institution: University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas

Survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may have difficulty learning because of problems with attention and working memory caused by the medications they receive during the course of their leukemia treatment. The Georgia and the Peachy Keens St. Baldrick's Supportive Care Research Grant is determining if children would be willing to complete 25 computer-based training sessions (designed as games) over an 8-week period, at home, while they are taking oral chemotherapy medications. These computer “games” are designed to improve attention and working memory. If this study proves that children are willing to complete the training and participate in short (10- to 15-minute) evaluations of their attention and memory, Dr. Winick will then test this intervention with a larger number of children to see how well it works and how long any effects last. This grant is named for the Georgia and the Peachy Keens Hero Fund which was created in honor of Georgia Moore’s 5th year past her cancer diagnosis. As a leukemia survivor, she inspires others to “just keep swimming” by raising awareness, hope and research dollars.

Nora Nock Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Cleveland, OH
Institution: Case Western Reserve University

Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with cancer have an increased risk of developing secondary cancers, cardiovascular, metabolic and bone diseases as well as cognitive impairments, which can reduce their survival and quality of life. Furthermore, most AYA cancer survivors do not meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity. Dr. Nock is conducting a pilot study using 'cybercycling' (stationary cycling with interactive video gaming) to improve quality of life in AYA cancer survivors. She will also see if this exercise program improves their motivation to exercise, body composition (weight, body fat), fatigue, depression, and sleep habits.

Sogol Mostoufi-Moab M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Philadelphia, PA
Institution: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia affiliated with University of Pennsylvania

Young age at diagnosis and intense therapy result in multiple late effects for Neuroblastoma survivors. The majority of High-Risk Neuroblastoma HR-NBL survivors have striking growth failure. Dr. Mostoufi-Moab is investigating the mechanism of growth failure in high-risk neuroblastoma survivors. Dr. Mostoufi-Moab is employing state-of-the art imaging measures of the growth plate to study and understand the mechanism of growth failure in high-risk neuroblastoma survivors, and target future intervention trials.

Suzanne Ameringer Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2016 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Richmond, VA
Institution: Virginia Commonwealth University affiliated with Children's Hospital of Richmond at VCU

Unrelieved symptoms lead to poorer quality of life for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. Strategies are needed to help AYAs manage symptoms. Dr. Ameringer and her team have developed the Computerized Symptom Capture Tool (C-SCAT), a novel way to assess symptoms where AYAs create a picture of their symptoms using images and text on an app. Dr. Ameringer is testing whether use of the C-SCAT improves the self-management of symptoms and patient-provider communication about symptoms in AYAs with cancer. Dr. Ameringer's findings will inform a larger trial of the C-SCAT as a strategy to improve AYA symptom self-management, and in turn, quality of life.

Andrew Smitherman M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: St. Baldrick's Fellow
Institution Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Institution: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill affiliated with UNC Children's Hospital

Most childhood cancer survivors develop complications associated with their treatment and many will require hospitalization. Dr. Smitherman is working to determine how often survivors are seen in an emergency department or hospitalized in the first years following completion of treatment. This research is also reviewing which medications are prescribed during this time to better understand what medical complications survivors are experiencing. With this knowledge, Dr. Smitherman hopes to prevent complications and improve survivors' quality of life.

Jonathan Posner M.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 02-28-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: New York, NY
Institution: Columbia University Medical Center affiliated with Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital, New York-Presbyterian

Survivors of pediatric brain tumors commonly struggle with progressive declines in attention and memory that emerge following neurosurgery, chemotherapy and radiation. Unfortunately, little is known about the neurobiological substrates of these cognitive dysfunctions. Dr. Posner's Grace for Good St. Baldrick’s Supportive Care Grant aims to identify the specific changes in functional and structural brain connectivity that correlate with neurocognitive decline by collecting advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological test data on survivors. This data is being compared with healthy controls across three academic medical centers: Columbia University Medical Center, Children’s Medical Center-Dallas and Seattle Children’s Hospital. This grant is named for the Grace for Good Fund created in honor of Grace Carey, a medulloblastoma survivor. It supports research of brain tumors and survivorship issues in the hopes of changing kids’ lives for good.

Lisa Schwartz Ph.D.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2018
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Philadelphia, PA
Institution: The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia affiliated with University of Pennsylvania

Adolescents and young adults with cancer do not receive adequate support and face a higher rate of relapse relative to younger patients. Dr. Schwartz's project is taking a current texting intervention which aims to improve health-related knowledge and engagement, and upgrading the technology and content in order to maximize the impact. This research aims to ultimately help improve the health and well-being of adolescents and young adults with cancer.

Jason Mendoza M.D., M.P.H.
Funded: 07-01-2015 through 06-30-2017
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Seattle, WA
Institution: Seattle Children's Hospital affiliated with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington

By increasing physical activity, survivors may reduce their risk of obesity and chronic diseases, and improve their quality of life. Dr. Mendoza's research aims to examine the use of a wearable physical activity device, the Fitbit, paired with a Facebook group, to increase physical activity among teen childhood cancer survivors. This approach aims to harness new wearable technology and the widespread use of smart phones to use individual- and peer-influences to promote physical activity.

Elizabeth Gage-Bouchard Ph.D.
Funded: 09-01-2014 through 08-31-2016
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Buffalo , NY
Institution: The University of Buffalo 

While great advances have been made in childhood cancer treatment, all children do not benefit equally from these innovations. Previous research suggests that disadvantaged children are more likely to die from cancer because their families have difficulty complying with treatment guidelines. Enhancing childhood cancer families’ abilities to adhere to treatment protocols is of critical importance to ensure that all children benefit from innovations in care. Dr. Gage-Bouchard is examining the factors that shape families’ abilities to comply with treatment protocols – a critical first step in developing interventions to increase treatment adherence among children diagnosed with cancer.

Jennifer C. Kesselheim M.D.
Funded: 12-01-2013 through 11-30-2015
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: Boston, MA
Institution: American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology

This grant develops, implements, and evaluates a novel curriculum in humanism and professionalism for pediatric oncology fellows. Funds will also be used to determine the optimal size of the pediatric hematology-oncology fellow workforce in order to meet the clinical demands of the field.

Laurence Baker D.O.
Funded: 12-01-2013 through 11-30-2014
Funding Type: Infrastructure Grant
Institution Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Institution: University of Michigan affiliated with C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital

This grant provides resources to establish a soft tissue sarcoma subspecialty team to improve patient outcomes and ensure the best transition for adults from pediatric survival clinic to adult care.

Sharon Castellino M.D., M.Sc.
Funded: 09-01-2013 through 07-31-2015
Funding Type: Supportive Care Research Grant
Institution Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Institution: Wake Forest University Health Sciences affiliated with Brenner Children's Hospital

Brain tumors are the most common solid cancer in children, and are often cured with radiation therapy. While radiation attacks the tumor, it can also leave the child with significant learning problems that affect their quality of life over the many years following cancer. Dr. Castellino focuses on understanding how heart function and brain vessel function may have been affected during treatment of the brain tumor. The goal of this research is to create strategies to prevent or lessen the injury to the brain during treatment, not only to cure the cancer in children, but also to preserve normal function for productive and healthy lives as cancer survivors.