Research

St. Baldrick’s Researcher Rethinks Childhood Cancer Treatment

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
June 21, 2017

Dr. Noah Federman first decided to become a doctor because he wanted to help people. Mission accomplished, Dr. Federman. Over his years as a physician, he’s helped countless children with cancer, including cancer survivors like 2013 St. Baldrick’s Ambassador Emily. Read on for more about Dr. Federman, his St. Baldrick’s Scholar award and what he envisions for the future of childhood cancer research.

Dr. Noah Federman

Dr. Noah Federman meets with a patient.

Dr. Noah Federman first met Emily back at the very beginning, soon after she discovered a persistent bump on her right leg — the first sign of a bone cancer called osteosarcoma.

The St. Baldrick’s Scholar has been there for Emily ever since, through the ups and downs of treatment, through her surgery and even now during survivorship, as she prepares to celebrate five years cancer free.

It’s a proud moment for Dr. Federman.

He became a doctor to make a difference in the lives of children like Emily — to help them beat cancer, get out of the hospital, and grow up healthy and happy.

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Families

How Immunotherapy Saved Phineas [VIDEO]

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
June 12, 2017

“Our son would not be with us today if it weren’t for St. Baldrick’s,” says Phineas’ dad, Carlos. Read on to see how research saved the little boy’s life.

VIDEO: Phineas’ Story >

Phineas Sandi smiles as he looks into the distance

On a mountain bike ride with a friend, 9-year-old Phineas was sailing along when he decided to take a risk and pedal over a bridge not meant for bicycle traffic. He wiped out in a big way.

But without so much as a single tear, he picked himself up, dusted himself off, and got back on the bike.

Compared to what this boy had been through two years before, that was nothing.

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Kids with Cancer

A Tale of Two Worlds: Emily’s Story of Survival

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
June 3, 2017

Today is National Cancer Survivors Day and in celebration, we are bringing you the survivorship story of 2013 Ambassador Emily, who was diagnosed with osteosarcoma as a 16-year-old. Now nearing five years cancer free, she’s a huge advocate for kids’ cancer research. She wants to see all kids with cancer leave the childhood cancer world behind — for good. Read on for more about Emily, her treatment and its effects, and what it’s like to be a survivor.

Emily before and Emily after

Emily in 2013, during her treatment for cancer (left) and Emily last month (right) in New York City, which she’s made her home after graduating from New York University.

Emily lives in two worlds.

In one, she just graduated from New York University, is cruising the Adriatic Sea over the summer, and snagged her dream job in television production.

The other world is different.

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Research

Meet Dr. Monica Gramatges

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
April 7, 2017

When Dr. Monica Gramatges meets a kid with cancer, she often breaks the ice by talking about art. That’s because she loves art and explored art therapy as a career before becoming a doctor. Read on to learn more about this St. Baldrick’s Scholar’s unique path to doctorhood and how she’s helping kids with leukemia.

Dr. Monica Gramatges

When Dr. Monica Gramatges was a medical student, she volunteered as an art teacher at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. There, she met an amazing little girl with leukemia and Down syndrome.

And that’s when something clicked. That’s when she decided she wanted to be a pediatric oncologist.

“They’d lost their hair, they weren’t feeling great, they were tired and nauseous, but they were still wanting to draw and paint, and were so creative,” she said. “These were just kids wanting to be kids, despite everything that was happening to them.”

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Research

Destroying the Defenses: Researchers Fight Brain Tumors With Immunotherapy

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
December 15, 2016

St. Baldrick’s Scholars Dr. Alex Huang and Dr. Agne Petrosiute are studying how switching off a protein could lead to new treatments and cures for kids with brain tumors. Read on for more about their unexpected discovery, its implications for immunotherapy, and why Dr. Huang compares himself to those fuzzy little bears in Star Wars.

Dr. Alex Huang and Dr. Agne Petrosiute

Dr. Agne Petrosiute (left) and Dr. Alex Huang study how the immune system can be harnessed to fight pediatric brain cancer.

Dr. Alex Huang likens himself and his colleague, Dr. Agne Petrosiute, to Ewoks battling the Death Star.

“We are the Ewoks that found the controller on this planet, and all of a sudden the Death Star cannot put up the shield anymore,” he said. “And so now, Luke Skywalker can go in there and blow it up.”

It may seem like a curious explanation, but it fits.

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Research

Researcher Spotlight: Meet Dr. Jessica Pollard

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
June 6, 2016

Every day, Dr. Jessica Pollard harnesses her love of science and her passion for research to fight for kids with AML. Read on for more about the longtime St. Baldrick’s Scholar and what she’s doing to give kids with cancer the childhoods they deserve.

Dr. Jessica Pollard

St. Baldrick’s Scholar Dr. Jessica Pollard does research on AML, one of the most common childhood cancers.

Dr. Jessica Pollard is all about analyzing prognostic factors. It floats her boat and puts the pep in her step. In fact, sometimes she burns the midnight oil doing just that.

But what exactly is this analyzing prognostic factor business that she likes so much?

In plain English, it’s examining certain things about a patient that can help tell her whether a person will recover from their cancer or relapse.

“My husband thinks I’m a geek, but you know, it keeps me going,” Dr. Pollard said.

Her geekery also saves lives.

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Research

Researcher Spotlight: Meet Dr. Peter de Blank

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
March 22, 2016

From MRIs to CT scans, kids with brain cancer get pictures taken of their tumors all the time. St. Baldrick’s Scholar Dr. Peter de Blank wants to get more out of those pictures, so that all children can lead long, healthy lives. Read on for more about this St. Baldrick’s Scholar and the exciting work he’s doing with a new imaging technology.

Ambassador Emily gets an MRI

Getting scans done is a routine part of life for a kid with cancer, like 2013 Ambassador Emily. Dr. Peter de Blank wants to use new technology to get more out of scans like these.

For Dr. Peter de Blank, a picture is not only worth a thousand words — a picture can save a life.

As a St. Baldrick’s Scholar at Case Western Reserve University, Dr. de Blank is studying how a new radiographic tool, called magnetic resonance fingerprinting, or MRF, might improve outcomes for kids with cancer.

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Facts

Pediatric Cancer Research Facts: A Decade of Successes [INFOGRAPHIC]

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
February 22, 2016

Kids are special, and childhood cancers are different than adult cancers. That’s why we’re funding research to find new therapies and cures just for kids.

We asked our researchers, “In the last 10 years, what’s been the greatest achievement in the field of pediatric cancer research?”

Here’s what they had to say.

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Facts

What Is Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)?

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
February 1, 2016
What is acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

What is acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of the white blood cells that normally fight infection. The cells do not grow and develop properly, filling up the bone marrow inside bones, where blood is normally made.

ALL is the most common type of childhood cancer, accounting for 35% of all cancers in children. Each year, there are about 2,900 new cases of children and adolescents diagnosed with ALL in the United States alone.

Meet Jack, an eight-time St. Baldrick’s shavee who was diagnosed with ALL >

Its signs and symptoms resemble other common illnesses, which often leads to other treatments before the leukemia diagnosis is made.

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Research

Researcher Targets Childhood Cancer With a Virus

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
October 14, 2015

Just mentioning herpes might make some people a little nervous, but in this story, herpes is the good guy. Read on for more about St. Baldrick’s Scholar Dr. Gregory Friedman’s work on a genetically altered version of the virus that could be the next targeted therapy for kids with brain tumors.

Dr. Friedman smiles with a young patient in an exam room

Dr. Friedman smiles with a young patient in an exam room at Children’s of Alabama.

St. Baldrick’s Scholar Dr. Gregory Friedman discovered that the herpes simplex virus, with a few modifications, will kill pediatric brain cancer cells — without causing cold sores.

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