Research

These Pediatric Oncologists Weren’t Expecting This Great News [VIDEO]

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
July 16, 2014

We surprised a few recipients of our 2014 Summer Grants with some exciting news — and we caught it all on video.

This is one of the most anticipated times of the year at the St. Baldrick’s Foundation: the time when we are able to turn generously given donations over to the hands of the world’s best childhood cancer researchers.

This year, we added a little twist.

We told these researchers we had one final video interview for them before we would announce our funding decisions.

Watch the video and you’ll see — we tricked them. But it was worth it.

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Research

Thank You for Funding Childhood Cancer Research

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
June 17, 2014

At a time when the federal government is tightening its budget, childhood cancer research funding is growing increasingly scarce.

Here at the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, we’re working hard to fill the funding gap — and we couldn’t do it without you.

Our dedicated grantees appreciate every hour, hair, and dollar you sacrifice to help them help kids with cancer. Here’s what some of them had to say.

'Every kid should have the opportunity to grow up and become whatever she or he wants. Thank you for helping make this simple dream come true.' Kenan Onel, M.D., Ph.D., St. Baldrick's research grant recipient

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Research

Funding First-Rate Children’s Cancer Research With St. Baldrick’s Summer Grants

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
May 29, 2014

st_baldricks_summer_grants

There is something more exciting than barbecues, beach balls, and sprinklers in the summertime at the St. Baldrick’s Foundation. Every summer, childhood cancer research grants are awarded to the best and most-promising researchers and institutions in the world — bringing us one step closer to a cure for childhood cancers.

Here’s how our grant funding cycles work:

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Kids with Cancer

Chase’s Best Shot: One Boy’s Remarkable Triumph Over Pediatric Brain Cancer

by Ellie Ewoldt
April 14, 2014

In August 2012, Chase was diagnosed with a rare and deadly pediatric brain tumor. Chase is now 4 and participating in a St. Baldrick’s-funded children’s cancer study, and his scans continue to show no evidence of disease. Chase’s mom, Ellie, shares his story.

Chase while in treatment for atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT)

Chase was diagnosed with ATRT, a type of brain cancer in children, when he was 2.

“He’s holding his head up on his own! This boy is going to be strong!”

The joyful doctor laid the small newborn baby on my chest as the oxygen raced into him and a tiny scream, that first sound, echoed in the room. This small, headstrong baby, born with so much fight, would be named Chase.

Two years, seven months, 18 days, and about 13 hours later, Chase’s older sister would run into our room in the middle of the night and tell us that Chase wouldn’t stop moving in his bed and it was keeping her awake. He wouldn’t stop because, as we quickly discovered, he couldn’t. He was having seizure.

Within minutes, I lay on an ambulance stretcher, one hand holding my headstrong baby and the other clutching an oxygen mask to his precious face.

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Head-Shaving

St. Baldrick’s Events in the Raleigh, NC and Triangle Area

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
January 7, 2014

See St. Baldrick’s events near Raleigh, North Carolina.

downtown-raleigh
Since 2004, the Triangle area St. Baldrick’s head-shaving events have raised over $6.8 million for childhood cancer research!

More than 52 Raleigh-area events took place in 2013, in honor of local children with cancer, survivors, and those who have passed away.

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Research

St. Baldrick’s Researcher Developing New Targeted Therapies for Ewing Sarcoma

by Rebecca Bernot, St. Baldrick's Foundation
December 2, 2013

Your donation to St. Baldrick’s supports pediatric cancer research. Donate now.

Ewing_sarcoma_research
There are things we can do that will increase our risk for cancer later in life, like tanning and smoking cigarettes. But childhood cancer is a different story.

Pediatric cancers are caused by genetic mutations. “However, since these mutations are unique to pediatric cancer, unique drugs need to be developed to treat these cancers,” explains Patrick Grohar, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of pediatric hematology-oncology at Vanderbilt University and a St. Baldrick’s research grant recipient.

Dr. Grohar is working to develop new drugs that target one particular mutation found in Ewing sarcoma tumors, ultimately yielding more effective and less toxic treatments for this form of childhood cancer.

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News

St. Baldrick’s Funds Childhood Cancer Research at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

by Rebecca Bernot, St. Baldrick's Foundation
October 10, 2013

childhood-cancer-research
The St. Baldrick’s Foundation is proud to award a total of $215,000 in pediatric oncology research grants to support the work of two physician-researchers at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

Linda Holmfeldt, Ph.D., received a $100,000 St. Baldrick’s Research Grant to support her project focused on hypodiploid acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients with this subtype of leukemia, in which the leukemic cells have lost multiple chromosomes, have a much lower chance of survival. Dr. Holmfeldt and her team have identified multiple gene mutations that are believed to be responsible for allowing the cancer to grow.

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Research

Using Chemical Genomics to Develop New Childhood Cancer Therapies

by Rebecca Bernot, St. Baldrick's Foundation
October 7, 2013

alveolar_rhabdomyosarcoma_research
Taosheng Chen, Ph.D., a St. Baldrick’s Research Grant recipient at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, has made noteworthy progress in his research that resulted in three scholarly journal publications. He is investigating the genetic mechanisms of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (aRMS), an aggressive soft-tissue cancer that primarily affects adolescents and young adults.

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Families

Childhood Cancer Research Funded by McKenna Claire Foundation and St. Baldrick’s Foundation Partnership

by Kristine Wetzel
September 9, 2013

McKenna-Claire-hula-hoop

By partnering with St. Baldrick’s, the McKenna Claire Foundation can “fund research that is close to our heart, while also benefiting from the resources of St. Baldrick’s to help the greater good,” says McKenna’s mom, Kristine.

This October, the McKenna Claire Foundation will celebrate its second anniversary. “Celebrate” doesn’t quite seem like the appropriate word, as starting a foundation to honor your deceased child isn’t typically on anyone’s list of things they wish to achieve during their lifetime.

We knew from the beginning that with a diagnosis of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG), the prognosis for McKenna was dismal. We promised her that we would do everything within our power to help her “feel better.” Because we had amazing friends who had turned over every rock and researched every DIPG doctor and research facility in the world, we knew we had done our very best for our daughter, but that modern medicine had failed us. Not for lack of caring or lack of heart amongst the doctors, but for lack of funding which limited research and the possibility of answers.

As she took her last breaths, we promised McKenna we would do everything in our power to fight in her name and ensure that no other child or family would suffer as she did, as we do.

Donating McKenna’s tumor to provide opportunities to develop cell lines and advance research was our first step to fulfilling the promise we made to our girl, and in fighting back against the tumor that took our child. But, for us, it wasn’t enough.

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Facts

St. Baldrick’s 2013 Summer Grants: Moving Closer to Cures for Children with Cancer

by Kathleen Ruddy, CEO, St. Baldrick's Foundation
July 16, 2013

Georgia-holding-balloons

Georgia was diagnosed with leukemia at the age of 10. Because of you, St. Baldrick’s is giving away $22 million in childhood cancer research grants to help find cures for kids with cancer.

It was Georgia’s 10th birthday, and she was being admitted to the hospital.

For two weeks, she hadn’t been feeling like herself. The pediatrician thought she was fighting a virus, but as days passed, Georgia became fatigued, shaky, and pale. When her parents brought her back to the doctor she was sent to the hospital for testing.

The next day, Georgia was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia — ALL, the most common type of childhood cancer.

But when Georgia’s mom shared this news with friends and family, she said something that caught my attention. She told them that Georgia had been diagnosed with ALL, a “very curable cancer of the blood.”

Georgia had cancer. But there was a cure.

A cure that was available because of childhood cancer research.

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