Facts

What Is Philadelphia Chromosome Positive ALL?

by Gordon Cohen M.D., M.P.H.
February 20, 2017
what is Ph+ALL

Dr. Gordon Cohen is a St. Baldrick’s Fellow at the John Hopkins Children’s Center. He’s testing new drugs for patients with Ph+ALL who relapse or fail to respond to treatment. He explains Ph+ALL symptoms, treatment options, and how your support is moving clinical trials forward to help kids with this disease.

What is Ph+ALL?

Philadelphia Chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ALL) is a rare subtype of the most common childhood cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

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Kids with Cancer

Meet Abby

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
January 5, 2017

Abby was first diagnosed with Ph+ ALL, a rare and aggressive type of leukemia, in February 2011. Soon, Abby was on a unique combination chemotherapy treatment available to her because of St. Baldrick’s-funded research.

2017 Ambassador Abby

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Families

‘Our Miracle’: An Update on Abby

by Patty Furco
November 15, 2016

Over the summer, Abby’s dad shared some news with us: Abby was still cancer free, but her organs were failing. The doctors told her she had 48 hours to live. But Abby disagreed, and four months later, Abby’s mom wants us to know that Abby is still here — and she’s been busy!

Abby and her mom spend a day at the beach

Abby and her mom on the beach in the spring. Abby underwent a bone marrow transplant for relapsed Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia in January 2015 and has been battling complications ever since.

It’s been four months since we brought Abby home.

We brought our baby home because the doctors truly believed that Abby was beyond saving and it was time for end-of-life care. All of the signs were there. To all of the health care professionals from many hospitals and specialties, Abby’s body was failing and we were doing more to her than for her.

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Kids with Cancer

‘My One Ticket to Live On’: How a Clinical Trial Saved Mitch Carbon’s Life

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
September 9, 2016

Like most college freshmen, Mitch Carbon is excited to be getting a fresh start. But unlike his peers, just two years ago, he didn’t think he’d live to see this day. Read on for more of Mitch’s story and the clinical trial that saved his life — all made possible by YOU.

Mitch hugs his dad

When Mitch Carbon was a junior in high school, he was preparing to die.

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Kids with Cancer

‘We Fight On’: An Update on Abby

by Joe Furco
July 15, 2016

Last month, we shared a glimpse into Abby’s life after a bone marrow transplant and the complications brought on by the very treatments that saved her life. Although cancer free, some of her organs are beyond repair. But even through these difficult days, Abby’s spirit remains strong. Her dad shares this update.

Furco Family Photo

Abby with her family.

Thursday morning before work, Abby’s doctors called.

On the line were two of her transplant doctors, some intensive care specialists, a social worker, and a quality of life doctor. They suggested I come back to the hospital to be with Abby and her mom, although there was nothing emergent.

Abby is sick, they said.

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Survivors

‘She’s a Fighter’: Abby Stays Strong After Her Bone Marrow Transplant [VIDEO]

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
June 5, 2016

Today is National Cancer Survivors Day, and we’re bringing you an update on one incredible 9-year-old: Abby. (You might remember her from this video.) Abby’s cancer free today, but for the past year, she’s been battling complications of the bone marrow transplant that saved her life.

Watch the new video to see why cancer free doesn’t mean trouble free.

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Events and Fundraisers

Sarah’s Shave for Abby [VIDEO]

by St. Baldrick's Foundation
April 27, 2016

Last month, 2012 Ambassador Sarah told us how excited she was for her upcoming shave. We were, too — so we filmed it!

When Sarah Swaim says that she knows what kids with cancer are going through, it’s true.

That’s because the three-time shavee is also a two-time childhood cancer survivor.

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Head-Shaving

Third Time’s the Charm: Sarah Gets Ready to Go Bald Again

by Sarah Swaim
March 4, 2016

It’s been over three years since 2012 Ambassador Sarah has seen herself bald. She’s breaking that streak on Saturday to be a shavee℠ for the third time. As a childhood cancer survivor, Sarah writes about what bravery looks like to her and what makes shaving so special this time.

Sarah and Abby in 2015

Sarah (left) smiles with Honored Kid Abby at Camp Fantastic in 2015.

I’m often asked if I’m nervous about my upcoming shave.

I can honestly say I’m not at all. After all, this will be my third time shaving my head for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation!

The usual response I get is, “You’re so brave.” But I don’t see myself as the brave one.

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Families

Divided, Yet Never So United: Our Family’s Continuing Journey With Childhood Cancer

by Patty Furco
September 24, 2015

Today Abby turns 9, and for the second year in a row, she’s celebrating her birthday in the hospital. Her mom, Patty, reflects on the past year and all the challenges their family has weathered together, from relapse to transplant to today.

Abby in her hospital bed

Abby last November, two months after her relapse.

What a year it has been.

Looking back at where we have been, the many states of mind and motions we have experienced … it’s enough to make my head spin.

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Research

Team of Researchers Targets DNA to Help Kids With Hard-to-Treat Leukemias

by Erinn Jessop, St. Baldrick's Foundation
July 16, 2015

They say two heads are better than one — what about lots of heads? Thanks to a St. Baldrick’s Consortium Grant, six teams of brilliant minds are working to give hope to kids with hard-to-treat leukemias.

A syringe gun

Fifty years ago, the most common childhood cancer, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), was one of the deadliest.

Cure rates have gone from near zero in the mid-1960s to about 90% currently. That’s amazing, said St. Baldrick’s researcher Dr. Stephen Hunger of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, but it’s not enough.

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