Why We Exist


The realities of childhood cancer

Worldwide, 175,000 children are diagnosed with cancer each year. And in the U.S., more children die of childhood cancer than any other disease—more than AIDS, asthma, cystic fibrosis, congenital anomalies and diabetes combined.

two-thirds of children graphical representation

Two-thirds of children treated for childhood cancer will suffer long-term effects from treatment including loss of hearing and sight, heart disease, secondary cancers, learning disabilities, infertility and more.

Childhood cancer isn't just one disease—there are over a dozen types of childhood cancer and countless subtypes, each requiring specific research to develop the best treatment for every child.

But in the last 20 years, only two new drugs have been specifically developed to treat children with cancer.

Less than 4% of the National Cancer Institute's budget is directed to childhood cancer research.


The St. Baldrick’s Foundation exists to change these realities

By working closely with leading pediatric oncologists, we determine the most promising research to fund and create funding priorities to make the greatest impact for children with cancer. Here are some creative ways we're doing just that:

a child recieving an eye exam

Providing hospitals the funds to open high-impact clinical trials for rare disease types, placing more children on studies to increase the rate of progress, while also increasing the likelihood for a child to receive the best treatment plan in a hospital near home.

scientists working together

Funding researchers to work together, so that research currently underway by the best and brightest investigators is shared between institutions, and even across continents, giving all children with cancer the best chance for a cure.

a child working with an adult scientist

Training the next generation of researchers—in 2005, a shortage of pediatric oncologists was predicted, and the St. Baldrick’s Foundation stepped in to ensure that every child with cancer will have a doctor and tomorrow's research will not be interrupted.

a child and brother riding tricycles

Funding supportive care research to improve the quality of life for patients and survivors. Supportive care research addresses the side effects of treatment, long-term effects faced by survivors, psychosocial aspects of childhood cancer and more.

While some organizations spread their research dollar between adult and children's cancers, every grant funded by the St. Baldrick’s Foundation is for childhood cancer research.

The St. Baldrick’s Foundation takes great care with every donor dollar, keeping the staff small, the expenses low and directing every possible dollar to childhood cancer research. Take a careful look at the expenses and see for yourself!


This can't be done without you

The St. Baldrick’s Foundation is volunteer-driven—from the founders who started it all to the volunteer who signed up today. You are the reason that the St. Baldrick’s Foundation can fund more grants than any organization besides the U.S. government. So get involved!

Children with cancer need your help. Donate Now Your donation will help save lives.